Category Archives: Toyota

TOYOTA RAV4 (Front)

TOYOTA RAV4 (Front)

When you replace the strut mount, you must check the shape of the piston rod. KYB shock absorbers 339031/32 have a flat surface and the strut mount must reflect this. These flat surfaces lock the piston rod in the installation position, allowing you to tighten or remove the nut. So, if you use the wrong strut mount, you are not able to assemble the parts correctly.

KYB shock absorbers 339031/32

Clutch Replacement – Citroen C1

The Citroën C1 was created in 2005 from a joint project between PSA Peugeot Citroën and Toyota. This popular city car has sold over 64,000 models in the UK and is starting to become a regular sight in the aftermarket.

Replacing a clutch on the C1 can be a little tricky, but with the guidance of LuK the whole process will become much easier. Nothing out of the ordinary is needed to complete the job, the only special tools required are a transmission jack, an engine support beam and a long axle stand. A two-post ramp was used in this example as a four-post ramp may not provide enough clearance.

For safety reasons its considered best practice to disconnect the battery earth lead before commencing work. If the vehicle has alloy wheels it may be fitted with anti-theft wheel bolts, so make sure you have the key before you start.

Disconnect the battery cables, remove the support clamp and lift the battery out. Undo the small satellite fuse box (not forgetting the hidden bolt at the rear (pictured below)) and stow it to one side.

Release the attached wiring harness from the battery tray and remove the tray, making sure you find the hidden bolt through the hole on the tray (pictured below).

Remove the securing clips on the gear linkage cables (pictured below) and the large tension spring. Undo and release the clutch cable from the transmission and stow it to one side. Unclip the reverse light switch and remove the bracket.

Install the support beam and undo the upper bell housing bolts and the starter motor upper bolt. Remove the gearbox supporting bracket (pictured below).

Remove the gearbox cover plate
Raise the vehicle and remove the N/S/F wheel. Remove the gearbox cover plate above the exhaust and disconnect the oxygen sensor. Drain the gearbox oil and undo the lower arm (pictured below) castle nut and pin and release the N/S drive shaft.

Undo the final starter motor bolt (pictured below, left) and remove the rear gearbox mounting (pictured below, right). Finally remove the remaining lower bell housing bolts and, while supporting the gearbox, pull it back to access the clutch and release bearing.

  

With the clutch removed, check to see if the vehicle has a Dual Mass Flywheel (DMF) fitted. If it has it will need to be checked for signs of heat stress and evidence of grease loss. The DMF should also be tested for freeplay and rock between the primary and secondary masses – LuK tool number 400 0080 10 is specifically designed for this purpose on all LuK manufactured DMFs. Full instructions and tolerance data for all LuK DMFs are contained on a CD which comes with this special tool.

Clean the first motion shaft splines and any debris from the bell housing (especially important when a release bearing has failed). Put a small dab of high melting point grease (not a copper-based product) on the first motion shaft splines and make sure the new driven plate slides freely back and forth. This not only spreads the grease evenly but also makes sure you have the correct kit. Wipe any excess grease off the shaft and driven plate hub. Using a universal alignment tool and checking the driven plate is the correct way round (note ‘Getriebe Seite’ is German for ‘Gearbox Side’), the clutch can be bolted to the flywheel evenly and sequentially.

Before fitting the gearbox make sure the locating dowels are in place and not damaged, refit any that have become dislodged. Inspect the release fork, cross shaft and bushes for wear and tear and refit the gearbox. Make sure the gearbox bell housing bolts are secured before lowering the jack. Refitting is the reverse of the removal.

Clutch replacement – Toyota RAV4 D4D

Toyota’s ‘Recreational Active Vehicle’ or to use its more commonly known name – ‘RAV4’ – has been produced in various forms since 1994. The second generation XA20, which was produced from 2000 to 2005, has sold many vehicles in the UK and as a direct result is a popular sight in the aftermarket. With its 4WD system, replacing a clutch and DMF on the RAV4 can be a little tricky, but with the guidance of the LuK the whole process will become much easier.

Nothing out of the ordinary is needed to complete the job, the only special tools required are a transmission jack, an engine support beam and a long axle stand. A two-post ramp was used in this example, as a four-post ramp may not provide enough clearance. For safety reasons it’s considered best practice to disconnect the battery earth lead before commencing work. If the vehicle has alloy wheels it may be fitted with anti-theft wheel bolts, so make sure you have the key before you start.

Disconnect the MAF sensor (pictured below) from the air inlet pipe and release the jubilee clip securing the pipe to the air filter housing.

Undo the plastic clip on the inlet pipe and release the attached harness. With a sharp pull, release the upper air filter housing from the inlet pipe. Unbolt and remove the lower air filter housing and release the attached harness. Undo the bolts holding the air filter support bracket and remove it. Remove the clips on the gear linkage cables and disconnect them. Undo the bolts securing the linkage bracket and remove. Undo the earth point on the gearbox casing and disconnect the reverse light switch (pictured below).

Release the gear selector cables (pictured below) from the support bracket and stow them to one side. For better access, remove the fuel pipes and the connector attached to the fuel filter housing and remove it by undoing the two bolts. Disconnect the speedo connector at the rear of the gearbox.

Clamp the slave cylinder pipe and undo it (pictured below). Once free, undo the support bracket and remove it. Undo the two starter motor bolts (access is hidden) and the upper bell housing bolts. Support the engine and undo the single long bolt securing the gearbox mooting to the chassis.

Raise the vehicle and remove both front road wheels. Drain the fluid from the transfer box and the gearbox. Unbolt the propshaft rear and centre supports and slide the shaft (pictured below) off the transfer box.

Undo both lower ball joints on each side and undo the front engine and rear gearbox mount. From underneath, unbolt both anti-roll bar and steering rack brackets (pictured below) from the subframe.

With sufficient support, undo the main subframe bolts – including the two at the front – and lower the subframe. Remove the driveshafts (pictured below) from the transfer box and remove the hub on the offside (to allow the long shaft to be removed).

Remove the transfer box bracket bolts and the lower bell housing bolts. With support, lower the gearbox and transfer box together down to the floor. With the clutch removed, check the Dual Mass Flywheel (DMF) for signs of heat stress and evidence of grease loss. The DMF should also be tested for freeplay and rock between the primary and secondary masses. LuK tool number 400 0080 10 is specifically designed for this purpose on all LuK manufactured DMFs.

Full instructions and tolerance data for all LuK DMFs are contained on a CD which comes with this special tool. Clean the first motion shaft splines and any debris from the bell housing (especially important when a release bearing has failed). Put a small dab of high melting point grease (not a copper-based product) on the first motion shaft splines and make sure the new driven plate slides freely back and forth. This not only spreads the grease evenly but also makes sure you have the correct kit.

Wipe any excess grease off the shaft and driven plate hub. Using a universal alignment tool and checking the driven plate is the correct way round (note “Getriebe Seite” is German for “Gearbox Side”), the clutch can be bolted to the flywheel evenly and sequentially.

Before fitting the gearbox make sure the locating dowels are in place and not damaged. Refit any that have become dislodged and refit the gearbox. Make sure the gearbox bell housing bolts are secured before lowering the jack.

Refitting is the reverse of the removal.

How to change a clutch on a Toyota Corolla

The Toyota Corolla was first launched in 1966 and has undergone several design alterations over its 11 generations. In July 2013, it reached a milestone by selling 40 million vehicles worldwide, so it will no doubt have made its presence felt in workshops throughout the UK.

This helpful guide should, therefore, prove handy for any garage looking to undertake a clutch repair. The clutch replacement is pretty straightforward, with no special tools required for the repair. A two-post ramp, two transmission jacks and an engine support beam were used for this repair.

It is important to note first that if the vehicle has alloy wheels fitted then you need to ensure that the locking wheel nut tool is available to remove them before starting the job.

Lift out the battery

Remove the engine top cover and then disconnect the battery terminals and stow. Undo the battery support clamp and lift out the battery. Remove the plastic battery support seat. Disconnect the Mass Air Flow (MAF) sensor switch from the air filter box and stow. Remove the air filter and housing compartment, which is secured in place with three bolts.

Unclip the wiring harness – connected to the gearbox by three clips – and undo the bolt for the earth cable bracket before stowing safely. Undo and release the two bolts holding the Clutch Slave Cylinder (CSC) to the gearbox (Fig 1) and undo the bolt that secures the hydraulic pipe on the top of the gearbox (Fig 2).

How to change a clutch on a Toyota Corolla

Fig 1

How to change a clutch on a Toyota Corolla

Fig 2

Stow towards the rear of the engine compartment. Remove the three accessible bell housing bolts at the top and disconnect the reverse light switch from the gearbox and stow. Remove the one accessible starter motor bolt. Support the engine by using the engine support beam. Undo the four bolts holding in place the top gearbox mount and undo the three bolts holding in place the gearbox support, before removing (Fig 3).

How to change a clutch on a Toyota Corolla

Fig 3

Raise the vehicle and remove both front wheels. Drain the gearbox oil. Undo and release the three securing nuts for the lower suspension arm links on both sides and detach the joints. Remove the splash guard and bottom section of the wheel arch liner from the nearside. Undo the driveshaft nuts and remove the drive shafts completely.

Remove the bottom front gearbox mount bolt (Fig 4) and the rear gearbox mount bolt (Fig 5).

How to change a clutch on a Toyota Corolla

Fig 4

How to change a clutch on a Toyota Corolla

Fig 5

The cross member will need to be removed; this is secured in place by six bolts – two bolts are at the front and four are at the rear (Fig 6).

How to change a clutch on a Toyota Corolla

Fig 6

When removing this, take extra care as it could drop suddenly. Remove the two gearbox brackets to allow some extra clearance for the gearbox removal. Undo the remaining starter motor bolts and remove.

Free the cables

Detach the gear linkage cables from the link arms held in by two clips. The clip for the first cable is on the top and the clip for the second cable is to the side (Fig 7).

How to change a clutch on a Toyota Corolla

Fig 7

The cables are then held in place within the bracket by two retaining plates. These were a little tricky to remove but, with a little perseverance, they eventually come loose. Once the cables are free, stow to the side securely. Remove the remaining bell housing bolts and carefully lower the gearbox to the floor.

Remove the worn clutch cover and clutch plate. With the clutch removed, check the flywheel for signs of heat stress such as hair line fractures or cracks. Clean the first motion shaft splines and any debris from the bell housing, which is especially important when a release bearing has failed.

Put a small dab of high melting point grease – not a copper-based product – on the first motion shaft splines, and make sure the new driven plate slides freely back and forth. This not only spreads the grease evenly, but also makes sure you have the correct kit.

Wipe any excess grease off the shaft and driven plate hub. Using a universal alignment tool, and checking the driven plate is the correct way round (note: “Getriebe Seite” is German for “Gearbox Side”) the clutch can be bolted to the flywheel evenly and sequentially.

Before fitting the gearbox, make sure the locating dowels are in place and not damaged. Refit any that have become dislodged and refit the gearbox. Make sure the gearbox bell housing bolts are secured before lowering the jack. Refitting is the reverse of the removal.

Clutch replacement – Toyota Aygo

Launched in 2005, the Toyota Aygo has proven particularly popular in the UK with over 110,000 vehicles on our roads. This handy article from LuK shows you how to correctly perform a clutch replacement on the semi- automatic transmission equipped variant.

Firstly, you should set around four hours aside for this repair. If the vehicle has alloy wheels then there is a good possibility that they’re secured with anti-theft bolts, so make sure the locking tool key is available before starting.

Before removing the gearbox the first thing to do is to set the clutch actuator into a default mode, which will release the preload. To do this install the diagnostic tool and set to the clutch clamp position to release the clutch fully. Failure to do this can result in damage to the adjustment mechanism. In this example we used a two-post ramp, an engine support beam and two transmission jacks to assist with the repair.

Gear selector unit

Disconnect the battery terminals and stow safely. Remove the battery support clamp and battery. Release five bolts that hold in place the battery tray and remove. Disconnect the three gear shift connector switches positioned on the gear selector unit (pictured). Disconnect the clutch cable from the release lever.

Remove the bolt that holds in place the wiring loom bracket. Disconnect the switch found at the front bottom of the gearbox and the switch found at the rear of the gearbox, before stowing the wiring loom aside. Completely remove the gear selector unit by removing the three securing bolts. It is a good idea to mark the positioning of the bolts to ensure the correct position when reinstalling the unit (pictured). Once removed, this will expose a connector switch underneath that can be disconnected. Stow safely to the side.

Remove the earth lead bracket that is held in place with two bolts and remove the oxygen sensor connection and bracket (pictured) and stow.

While the vehicle is still at ground level it is a good idea at this point to remove the top two accessible bell housing bolts and one starter motor bolt (pictured). Remove the engine top mount bolts and support the engine with the support beam. Raise the vehicle and drain the gearbox oil. Remove both front wheels and, on the nearside, release the inside wheel arch liner by removing three bolts.

Only the front section needs to be released for better access when lowering the gearbox. Unbolt the bottom ball joints and release from the lower suspension arms on both sides. Remove the drive shafts from the gearbox and the wheel hubs. Remove the bottom gearbox stabiliser (pictured) which is held by three bolts: two at the front and one that secures from the rear through the subframe. Slide the stabiliser out from the subframe.

Remove the back plate from the gearbox (held by three bolts) and remove the starter motor bolt from the rear (pictured). Support the gearbox using the transmission jacks and remove the remaining three bell housing bolts.

Lower the gearbox

Carefully lower the gearbox to the floor and remove the worn clutch cover, drive plate and release bearing. With the clutch removed, check the flywheel for signs of heat stress. Clean the first motion shaft splines and any debris from the bell housing (especially important when a release bearing has failed).

Put a small dab of high melting point grease (not a copper-based product) on the first motion shaft splines and make sure the new driven plate slides freely back and forth. This not only spreads the grease evenly but also makes sure you have the correct kit. Wipe any excess grease off the shaft and driven plate hub. Using a universal alignment tool and checking the driven plate is the correct way round (note “Getriebe Seite” is German for “Gearbox Side”) the clutch can be bolted to the flywheel evenly and sequentially.

Before fitting the gearbox, make sure the locating dowels are in place and not damaged. Refit any that have become dislodged and refit the gearbox. Make sure the gearbox bell housing bolts are secured and the gearbox stabiliser is installed before removing the transmission jacks.

Refitting is the reverse of removal, making sure you don’t forget to reset the clutch actuator and gears using your diagnostic equipment.

How to fit a clutch on a Toyota Yaris

VEHICLE: Toyota Yaris 2016 1.3 VVT-I model with engine code 2SZ-FE
LABOUR TIME: 4.9 HOURS
LUK CLUTCH INSTALLED: 620317300

The first generation of Toyota Yaris was launched in 1999 and it has since gone on to become a popular city car, with the model used for this month’s clinic boasting over 150,000 vehicles on the road today. As a major OE supplier to Toyota, LuK is in a good position to offer handy hints and tips to any UK independent aftermarket garage looking to undertake this repair.

For this procedure we used a two-post ramp, a transmission jack, an engine support bridge and an alignment tool. Before starting, if the vehicle is fitted with alloy wheels then make sure that the locking wheel nut tool is available.

Start by disconnecting and removing the battery and the base plate, as this allows clear access to the top mount.

Disconnect the control links of the gearbox selector and then the reverse sensor plug.

Stow the plug and links to avoid any damage and prohibit the removal of the gearbox. Install the engine support bridge and remove the top mount.

Whilst the vehicle is still on the ground, the external slave cylinder can be removed. Special care should be made as the hydraulic components do not necessarily require replacing (unless they’re damaged) so you must ensure that the components are in perfect operating condition.

During the removal of the external slave cylinder take care not to damage the protective rubber boot and the flexible and rigid sections of the hydraulic pipes; any damage to these will constitute replacement of the parts.

Stow clear from the working area so they do not get caught or tangle when removing the gearbox.

Lift the vehicle and remove both front wheels and engine undertray. You should then drain the gearbox oil. Starting on the nearside, remove the drive shaft nut, remove the bottom ball joint fixing and, using a lever, extract the bottom ball joint from its position. Carefully knock the drive shaft out of the hub and, taking extra care not to damage the oil seal in the gearbox, remove the shaft completely.

Follow this procedure on the off side as well.

Support the gearbox using the transmission jack and remove the bottom mount.

Remove the bell housing bolts and starter (these do not cause much difficulty) and the gearbox is then ready to be lowered to the floor.

Unbolt the old clutch from the flywheel and check the flywheel for thermal stress and wear.

Clean the first motion shaft splines and any debris from the bell housing (especially important when a release bearing has failed). It is also important to check the condition of the release fork as any wear in the fork, cross shaft and bushes will prematurely wear the clutch.

Put a small dab of high melting point grease (not a copper-based product) on the first motion shaft splines and make sure the new driven plate slides freely back and forth. This not only spreads the grease evenly but also makes sure you have the correct kit. Wipe any excess grease off the shaft and driven plate hub. Using a universal alignment tool, and checking the driven plate is the correct way round (note “Getriebe Seite” is German for “Gearbox Side”), the clutch can be bolted to the flywheel evenly and sequentially.

Grease the fork joint and refit the new release bearing. Before fitting the gearbox make sure the locating dowels are in place and not damaged. Refit any that have become dislodged and refit the gearbox. Make sure the gearbox bell housing bolts are secured before lowering the jack. Refitting is the reverse of the removal.

For the latest in online support log on to www.repxpert.com.

MEET THEM AT MECHANEX
Schaeffler Automotive Aftermarket’s three quality brands – LuK, INA and FAG – will all be in attendance throughout 2016 at our MECHANEX trade shows.

Offering visitors the opportunity to talk to Schaeffler’s group of experienced experts who will be on hand to offer helpful demonstrations and workshop hints, attendees can also find out about the latest technologies that will soon be appearing in their workshop.

Why was the Prius Cranky?

Jim Gilmour, Technical Trainer at Blue Print, investigates a situation where the engine starts and then cuts out on a 2008 Gen 2 Toyota Prius.

Having trained hundreds of technicians on hybrid vehicles it is always good to hear that our efforts are worthwhile and that these vehicles are now being repaired by aftermarket professionals.

I recently had a call from one technician who had attended a Blue Print hybrid training course and had received a visit from a 2008 Gen 2 Toyota Prius which drove ‘very slowly’.

The engine management light was on and the battery indicator in the centre screen was showing empty. He had scanned the Prius and retrieved DTC: ‘P0A0F – Engine Failed to Start’. “But it starts and runs for about 15 seconds then cuts out” he said bewilderedly. “Are you sure it runs?” I asked. “Smooth as silk but only for about 15 seconds and then it cuts out,” he affirmed.

I asked him to go back in with the diagnostic tool and give me some high voltage battery data.

The battery’s State of Charge (SOC) was down to just 18%, which is critically low; the normal SOC ranges between 30% and 80%. I asked him to put the car into ‘Ready Mode’ and, when the engine starts, to feel for heat at the exhaust pipe. He did this and told me it was cold. Therefore no combustion was taking place.

Solving the mystery
The engine in the Prius is started by Motor Generator 1 (MG1) in the transmission. During start-up the valve timing is adjusted so that the inlet valve is closed at 78° before TDC. This gives very light compression and, with the throttle open, very little pumping losses on the induction stroke.

Toyota calls this the ‘Atkinson Cycle’, which gives improved mechanical efficiency and is deployed under light load. MG1 cranks the engine at 1,200rpm and, to anybody listening, it sounds just like the engine is running. It wasn’t of course and the engine stops cranking when a non-start is detected.

So now the mystery was solved, but the bad news was that the battery was very low on charge and our friend now had the job of diagnosing the non-start problem without too many chances to crank the engine.

This is an unusual situation for a technician and a real test of his diagnostic skills. All credit to him, the fault turned out to be an ignition coil wiring issue which he subsequently rectified.

The engine started and the battery was soon up to a reasonable SOC.

Front wheel bearing replacement – Toyota Corolla

First introduced back in 1966 the Toyota Corolla has been with us for a massive 60 years, and incredibly, according to Toyota, one Corolla is sold on average every 40 seconds worldwide! The Corolla has been massively popular in the UK which is mainly due to its high reliability record and reputation for quality. These factors make it a popular purchase for familes and taxi drivers for example.

The 8th generation Corolla (E110) was introduced in 1995 and since then 62,878 models have been sold in the UK until production was stopped in 2002. In this article we are going to look at how to replace the front wheel bearing on the Corolla, and give you some handy hints and tips to help you on your way.

The type of bearing used on the Corolla can be a little tricky to fit because it has to be pressed into the hub and onto the flange, and during this process if its done incorrectly you can damage the bearing prematurely. But don’t worry because the bearing experts at FAG are here to help with this useful guide.

Firstly check to see if the vehicle has alloy wheels fitted, if it has it may be fitted with antitheft bolts so you’ll need to find the key. Raise the vehicle on a ramp (although the job could be done on the ground if necessary) and remove the wheel on the relevant side. Undo the three bolts securing the bottom suspension arm and release it. Undo the bolts (see pic, below) securing the brake calliper to the hub.

Push the brake cylinder back (see pic, below) and slide the calliper off.

Undo the screw securing the disk to the hub and remove the brake disc. On the steering arm ball joint pull out the pin, undo the castellated nut and release the joint. Remove the hub nut pin (see pic, below), undo the nut and release the driveshaft from the hub.

Undo the two large bolts (see pic, below) holding the hub to the suspension strut and release.

Remove the hub assembly from the vehicle (see pic, below).

Using a press push out the flange from the hub. Remove the two metal rubber seals (see pic, below) and push out the large metal flange around the outside.

Once the seals have been removed you should be able to see a large circlip (see pic, below), remove this with a suitable set of circlip pliers.

With the circlip removed use the press to release the bearing from the hub. Finally use the press to extract the inner race that’s still attached the the flange. The new bearing can now be fitted.

Hub profile
Take the time to check that the hub profile is perfectly round and not damaged. The outer race of a bearing will always take the shape of the hub its being pressed into, therefore if the hub has been damaged and is oval this could prematurely wear the bearing over time. its important to not put any force through the balls or rollers inside the bearing. With this in mind when you press the bearing into the hub make sure you press on the outer race, and when pressing the bearing onto a flange use the inner race. By doing this we ensure that the pressing force is not transmitted through the bearing rollers/balls, but only through the metal race.

Many types of new wheel bearing will have an ABS encode ring placed just behind the oil seal on one side of the bearing. FAG colour-code the oil seals to indicate which side has the encoder in it; generally a black seal represents the side of the bearing that contains the encoder ring. However if you are unsure we do provide some detector cards which are available from your local stockists.

And finally its worth pointing out that the clamp load is essential on these types of bearings, so make sure you use a torque wrench when tightening the hub nut or bolt. Failure to do this could lead to premature failure of the new bearing.

Fitment of the bearing is the reverse of the removal.

Toyota Avensis D4D front wheel bearing replacement

The Toyota Avensis 2.0 D4D is a large family car. Introduced to the market in 1997, it has seen three generations of build, with the last being introduced from 2009 to the present day. In this article, we tackle the second generation Toyota Avensis D4D front wheel bearing and give some handy hints and tips to assist with the replacement.

Bearing type

The type of bearing used is a generation one bearing with no encoding sensor built in, so the bearing can be installed in either way. It can, however, still be a little tricky as the bearing has to be pressed into the hub and, if done incorrectly during this process, can damage the bearing.

Firstly, check to see if the vehicle is fitted with alloy wheels. If it has, the chances are that they may be fitted with anti-theft locking bolts, so make sure that you have the key before starting the repair. Raise the vehicle on the ramp to the full working height – although the repair could be carried out on the floor if necessary – and remove the wheel on the relevant side.

Whenever possible it is advised to replace the wheel bearings in pairs as it is more than likely that the bearing on the opposite side is just as worn as the one you are replacing. Undo the large hub nut that secures the drive shaft to the hub and release the drive shaft from its position. Clean the track rod end, using a wire brush to remove any hard rust, and remove the locking pin. Loosen and remove the nut from the track rod end, release from its position and move to one side (Fig 1 below).

Fig 1

Remove the brake calliper piston and support by hooking it directly to the coil spring (Fig 2 below).

Fig 2

Remove the two bolts that secure the brake calliper to the hub and remove the complete assembly away from the work area. You will need to gain access to the wheel arch, but the removal of the wheel arch liner is unnecessary, so just remove the fixing bolts to the front half of the liner and allow it to hang down (Fig 3 below).

Fig 3

The ABS sensor is to be disconnected, and this can be found inside the wheel arch. With the liner now free you will have enough access to reach the sensor and disconnect it (Fig 4 below).

Fig 4

Remove the ABS lead from its support bracket once disconnected.

Remove the flange

Release the wishbone from the ball joint by removing two bolts. Undo the two bolts that secure the hub to the suspension strut and release it from the strut. With the hub removed, we can now concentrate on the removal of the bearing. Firstly, the drive flange has to be removed from the bearing; in this example we used a strong steel tube positioned centrally on the flange. By using a press, carefully push the flange out to remove (Fig 5 below).

Fig 5

Remove the back plate from the hub to make it easier to remove the bearing and remove the circlip. We removed the bearing from the wheel hub by using an old bearing and, through the use of a press, we pushed the bearing out. Because the bearing can be fitted either way, it could be a good idea to note the position of the old bearing and install the new bearing the same way.

The inner raceway of the bearing will then have to be removed from the hub; it can be a little tricky to attach a puller securely to remove this. Hold the hub securely in a vice and, with a die grinder, carefully score part way through the inner race – just enough to weaken it and taking extra care not to cut right through and damage the hub (Fig 6 below).

Fig 6

Using a blunt air chisel to crack and then remove is a nice controlled way of extracting the inner race without causing damage. Once the bearing has been removed, take the time to check that the hub profile is perfectly round and not damaged.

The outer race of a bearing will always take the shape of the hub its being pressed into so, if the hub has been damaged and is not perfectly round, this could prematurely wear the bearing over time. Clean the hub and drive flange to remove any dirt and rust.

Pressing force

When you fit the bearing into the hub, make sure you press on the outer race and not on the flange. By doing this you ensure that the pressing force is not transmitted through the balls or rollers in the bearing, but only through the outer race. In our case we’ve used the old bearing to press the new one into the hub as this is a perfect diameter and will not cause any damage.

The new bearing will have a new circlip supplied, which can now be fitted. After finding a suitably sized tube (the same size as the inner race) the hub can then be pressed onto the drive flange, avoiding any damage to the ball races. The installation of the remaining parts is the reverse of the removal.

How to fit a clutch on a Toyota Yaris

VEHICLE: Toyota Yaris 2016 1.3 VVT-I model with engine code 2SZ-FE
LABOUR TIME: 4.9 HOURS
LUK CLUTCH INSTALLED: 620317300

The first generation of Toyota Yaris was launched in 1999 and it has since gone on to become a popular city car, with the model used for this month’s clinic boasting over 150,000 vehicles on the road today. As a major OE supplier to Toyota, LuK is in a good position to offer handy hints and tips to any UK independent aftermarket garage looking to undertake this repair.

For this procedure we used a two-post ramp, a transmission jack, an engine support bridge and an alignment tool. Before starting, if the vehicle is fitted with alloy wheels then make sure that the locking wheel nut tool is available.

Start by disconnecting and removing the battery and the base plate, as this allows clear access to the top mount.

Disconnect the control links of the gearbox selector and then the reverse sensor plug.

Stow the plug and links to avoid any damage and prohibit the removal of the gearbox. Install the engine support bridge and remove the top mount.

Whilst the vehicle is still on the ground, the external slave cylinder can be removed. Special care should be made as the hydraulic components do not necessarily require replacing (unless they’re damaged) so you must ensure that the components are in perfect operating condition.

During the removal of the external slave cylinder take care not to damage the protective rubber boot and the flexible and rigid sections of the hydraulic pipes; any damage to these will constitute replacement of the parts.

Stow clear from the working area so they do not get caught or tangle when removing the gearbox.

Lift the vehicle and remove both front wheels and engine undertray. You should then drain the gearbox oil. Starting on the nearside, remove the drive shaft nut, remove the bottom ball joint fixing and, using a lever, extract the bottom ball joint from its position. Carefully knock the drive shaft out of the hub and, taking extra care not to damage the oil seal in the gearbox, remove the shaft completely.

Follow this procedure on the off side as well.

Support the gearbox using the transmission jack and remove the bottom mount.

Remove the bell housing bolts and starter (these do not cause much difficulty) and the gearbox is then ready to be lowered to the floor.

Unbolt the old clutch from the flywheel and check the flywheel for thermal stress and wear.

Clean the first motion shaft splines and any debris from the bell housing (especially important when a release bearing has failed). It is also important to check the condition of the release fork as any wear in the fork, cross shaft and bushes will prematurely wear the clutch.

Put a small dab of high melting point grease (not a copper-based product) on the first motion shaft splines and make sure the new driven plate slides freely back and forth. This not only spreads the grease evenly but also makes sure you have the correct kit. Wipe any excess grease off the shaft and driven plate hub. Using a universal alignment tool, and checking the driven plate is the correct way round (note “Getriebe Seite” is German for “Gearbox Side”), the clutch can be bolted to the flywheel evenly and sequentially.

Grease the fork joint and refit the new release bearing. Before fitting the gearbox make sure the locating dowels are in place and not damaged. Refit any that have become dislodged and refit the gearbox. Make sure the gearbox bell housing bolts are secured before lowering the jack. Refitting is the reverse of the removal.

 

MEET THEM AT MECHANEX
Schaeffler Automotive Aftermarket’s three quality brands – LuK, INA and FAG – will all be in attendance throughout 2016 at our MECHANEX trade shows.

Offering visitors the opportunity to talk to Schaeffler’s group of experienced experts who will be on hand to offer helpful demonstrations and workshop hints, attendees can also find out about the latest technologies that will soon be appearing in their workshop.