Category Archives: Suzuki

Old School Diagnosis: Suzuki Vitara

Old School Diagnosis: Suzuki Vitara

Josh Jones had his hands full with an old- school Suzuki Vitara this month. Here, he recalls how refreshing it was to work ‘scan tool-free’ and go back to basics.

I have had a few blasts from the past this month – it really does feel like I have traveled back 15 years to my apprenticeship, and its been fun. In between working on a car fitted with actual K-Jetronic mechanical injection (I appreciate some people reading this now won’t even know what that is, which makes me feel very old indeed) and another fitted with a real life distributor, was a 1998 Suzuki Vitara with a 1.6L G16B engine fitted. This vehicle had been passed to a local garage with a non-start issue and unfortunately they had drawn a blank on the cause, so I was asked to take a look. I welcome the chance to work scan tool-free, and as the vehicle was built before the start of the current millennium, I do not possess a serial communication tool compatible with this vehicle!

The thing I love about this particular type of car is the accessibility of pretty much any component, making it easy to test. Most of us are now used to unobtrusive testing. Gaining access to specific components can be a seriously time consuming process if, in the end, no positive result comes from the graft.

On the Suzuki, however, it was kind of like working on a training rig. For instance, simply look under the dashboard and there is the ECU, held in place by only two 10mm bolts – lovely. Upon cranking, the engine was not noisy and did not display any signs of mechanical fault. So, with my trusty DVOM and scope, I set to work.

Believe it or not, the engine was fitted with single point injection and with the injector harness itself being clear to see and test, I decided the easiest starting point would be to check voltages to establish if the engine ECM was at least powering up, i also wanted to check if the engine’s rotation was being picked up correctly by the crank sensor, and thus initiating fuelling and ignition. The injector was easy to separate as there were simply two wires emerging from the centre of the throttle housing and they were linked to the main wiring loom via a connector. I connected here with a power probe to check operation on cranking, but got absolutely nothing – no ignition supply or switching signal on either wire. Was the ECM even powering up? Upon cycling the ignition switch, I listened for a fuel pump prime and could hear one for definite. In light of this, I was sure the control unit was at least coming to life when the key was turned on.

To check if the spark ignition side of things was operational, I carried out a simple test using the same two wires, in order to save time. With the fuel injector disconnected at the aforementioned plug, I manually activated it with the power probe for a very short period. The injector could be heard to click and the holding pressure in the fuel system from previous ignition cycles delivered a very small amount of fuel into the inlet manifold. I then simply cranked the engine, which straight away coughed into life – briefly – before obviously dying again. I was confident I was looking at a lack of fuel injection as the cause of the non-start condition.

According to a wiring diagram of this particular engine management system, the fuel injector is not only controlled by the ECM but is also electrically driven by it directly, as opposed to the power source coming from a control relay as per most multipoint systems. My next task was to evaluate the integrity of the connections between the injector and ECM, but this is where things got a bit strange for a moment. With the ignition switch turned off and with the injector disconnected at the same multi- plug, I carried out a continuity test from the injector control terminal on the ECU side of the plug and battery negative, simply to check whether or not there was an open circuit. When the ignition was turned on, the test showed an open circuit. When the ignition was turned back off, about five seconds would elapse before the ground path would return, presumably via the ECM. It was at this point that a little nagging thought from earlier came back into my head. Up until this point, I had not paid much attention to the fact that there had been no sign of a ‘check engine’ warning lamp displayed, even in a ‘key on, engine off mode’, which is why I needed to use the fuel pump prime as a rudimentary way of confirming ECM power up.

On a newer model, no EML would have rung alarm bells straight away, but as this vehicle was pre EOBD, I simply did not pay enough attention to the missing lamp. Upon closer inspection of the instrument cluster, I found that there was a poor connection on the PCB. This turned out to be the ‘check engine’ lamp, which was trying its best to frantically flash at me every time the key was turned on, but could not due to the loose bulb. A check of the owner’s manual (which was still present, amazingly) confirmed my suspicion – a flashing lamp was a warning that the key transponder was not recognised!

After this discovery, I wanted to confirm that it was indeed the key transponder itself at fault and not any wiring or immobiliser module issues, as this could have potentially made the vehicle uneconomical to repair. I used my amps probe (see above) to connect to the receiver ring circuit of the immobiliser. When the key was cycled to the ignition position, the immobiliser control unit attempted to probe for a response from the key chip before giving up (see below).

Carrying out the diagnosis this way allowed me to understand the functionality of the factory immobiliser system. It certainly explained the open ECM injector circuit; when the ignition was cycled, the immobiliser obviously isolated it and the key was not being recognised. It was also interesting to note that spark ignition was still operating, even though the fuel system was disabled upon the security system becoming active.

After a call to my friendly local locksmith, it was confirmed that a new transponder was very easy to program. After his visit, I checked to see that – with the current probe – the key was once again responding correctly. You could clearly see a difference – only one ‘pulse’ was needed to communicate before the chip was energised to respond. The rhino was ready to roam the plains once more. Lesson learned!

How to Fit a Clutch on a Suzuki Alto

This month’s article documents a clutch replacement in a 2010 Suzuki Alto, fitted with a 1.0L, three-cylinder K10B engine, which has covered more than 70,000 miles. The customer reported clutch slip, which was confirmed by a short road test, and clutch replacement was advised.

The Suzuki Alto is quite a popular car on today’s roads – its initial cost being relatively low and with a good return on fuel. Suzuki launched the Alto in 1979 and it has been on the UK roads since 1981. The latest Suzuki Alto is the eighth generation.

When opening the bonnet and carrying out an initial inspection, working space is at a premium, but with a little guidance, this is a good repair for any garage with a book time of 5.1 hours.

For this fix we used the following workshop equipment: a two-post ramp and a transmission jack. With the car placed on the ramp, starting in the engine bay, disconnect and remove the battery, battery case and battery carrier. The wiring loom retaining clips need to be unclipped from the battery carrier when removing.

Now remove the air box/induction noise damper (see below) allowing more access to the gearbox and bell housing area. Slacken the clutch cable and then remove the cable from the clutch release arm, open the plastic retaining clip to release the cable and then slide the outer cable away from the support bracket (light lubrication may help the rubber slide out of the bracket) and stow in the bulkhead area. Remove the clutch cable support bracket as this gives a little extra room.

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Disconnect the reverse light switch multiplug and stow the loom in the inner wing. Disconnect the gear change cables from the selector mechanism by removing the ‘U clip’ from the front cable (see below) and then detaching from the ball pivot. Disconnect the rear cable by removing the bolts from the pivot point bracket and removing the assembly (note – there is a small nylon bush located in this assembly that can fall out). Slide the outer cables upwards and out of their support bracket and stow in the bulkhead area, then disconnect the gearbox earth wire and bracket.

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Now remove the upper bell housing bolts whilst the vehicle is on the ground and the bolts are easily accessible, storing in order and location. Next, slacken both driveshaft hub nuts and raise the vehicle to waist height. Remove both front wheels and hub nuts and the plastic shield in the N/S/F wheel arch area (see below), raise the vehicle to access the underside, drain the gearbox oil and then remove the locking pins from both bottom ball joint nuts and then take out the nuts and release both bottom ball joints. Both driveshafts can then be released from the respective hubs.

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Then, using a lever, ‘snap’ the inner driveshaft joints out of the gearbox, as these are retained by spring-loaded retaining rings, and remove the driveshafts and stow safely. Now take out the rear gearbox mount which is done by releasing the mounting from the bracket, and then the bracket from the gearbox – it is worth mentioning that the mounting and the bracket cannot be fully removed, but moved to give enough room to work.

Remove the rear bell housing bolts, which are now accessible, and support the engine (we used a transmission jack in this instance) close to the bell housing area. Next, remove both the front gearbox mounting and the mounting bracket from the gearbox, lower the transmission jack about 50mm to aid gearbox removal and remove the final bell housing bolts. The gearbox can now be taken from the vehicle, either by lifting it out by hand or using a second transmission jack.

With the gearbox gone (see below), the clutch can be removed from the flywheel and, as suspected, the clutch had been worn out. This vehicle is fitted with a solid flywheel, so inspect for any damage or heat cracks, confirm the flywheel is serviceable and remove the glaze from the flywheel face with some Emory cloth and clean the flywheel area with some clutch and brake dust cleaner. Finally, remove the release bearing from the release arm in the bell housing.

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At this point we noticed that the release fork/arm had restricted movement due to the build-up of clutch dust at the pivot points and would not return to its rest position (see below), so we cleaned out the area with clutch and brake dust cleaner, and inspected the release system for any wear and carried out a check for correct and full operation (see below).

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Fit the new release bearing, applying a very small amount of high melting point grease to the pivot areas as these are all metal. Apply a small amount of high melting point grease to the gearbox input shaft splines, then mount the clutch plate, confirming its correct position, and remove the clutch plate, wiping off any excess grease. Now mount the new clutch assembly onto the flywheel (see below) using a clutch alignment tool, ensuring the clutch plate is installed correctly so that the ‘Gearbox side’, or ‘Getriebe Seite’, markings on the clutch plate are facing the gearbox, tightening and torqueing the bolts evenly and sequentially.

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Re-fit the gearbox in reverse order of removal and refill the gearbox with oil. Before fitting the clutch cable, check the cable for free operation and when adjusting always remember to leave a little free play at the top of the pedal to ensure a full release. Once the repair is complete, carry out a road test to ensure the clutch and gear change operation is correct and that all electrical items have been reset after re-connecting the battery.

 

How to change a clutch on a Suzuki Alto

The Suzuki Alto, in its fifth generation guise, was sold in the UK from 1994 to 2003. During these production years Suzuki has sold over 36,000 models in the UK and as these vehicles are getting older, more and more are starting to appear in the UK aftermarket scene.

Replacing a clutch on the Suzuki Alto can be a little tricky, but with the guidance of the LuK ‘Clutch Clinic’ the whole process will become much easier. Nothing out of the ordinary is needed to complete the job, the only special tools required are a transmission jack, an engine support beam and a long axle stand. A two-post ramp was used in this example as a four-post ramp may not provide enough clearance.

For safety reasons its considered best practice to disconnect the battery earth lead before commencing work. If the vehicle has alloy wheels it may be fitted with anti-theft wheel bolts, so make sure you have the key before you start.

Disconnect the battery earth lead. Raise the vehicle slightly and remove both front road wheels and both drive shaft hub nuts. Release both driveshafts from the hub and remove the clutch cable fixing on the bearing release arm (pictured below).

Unclip the reverse light switch connector and remove the speedometer by pulling out the circlip (pictured below) and lifting the speedometer head out of the transmission.

Remove the starter motor fixing bolts and all the accessible upper bell housing bolts. Unbolt the earth strap (pictured below) from the gearbox and secure the engine with the support beam. Carefully undo the gearbox support bracket.

Gaining access
Raise the vehicle and drain the gearbox oil. Undo both lower arms by removing the single bolt and release them from the hubs. Remove both driveshafts from the hub and the gearbox. Once the shafts are removed, access can now be made to the gearbox filler bung which should be removed ready for refilling. refilling. Unbolt the closing plate (pictured below, left) on the gearbox and the gear linkage (pictured below, right).

Unbolt the front and rear gearbox support brackets and undo the remaining bell-housing bolts. With support, the gearbox can now be lowered to the floor.

With the clutch removed, clean the first motion shaft splines and any debris from the bell housing – especially important when a release bearing has failed. Put a small dab of high melting point grease – not a copper based product – on the first motion shaft splines and make sure the new driven plate slides freely back and forth. This not only spreads the grease evenly but also makes sure you have the correct kit. Wipe any excess grease off the shaft and driven plate hub. Using a universal alignment tool and checking the driven plate is the correct way round (note “Getriebe Seite” is German for “Gearbox Side”) the clutch can be bolted to the flywheel evenly and sequentially.

Before fitting the gearbox make sure the locating dowels are in place and not damaged, refit any that have become dislodged. Inspect the release fork, cross shaft and bushes for wear and tear and refit the gearbox. Make sure the gearbox bell housing bolts are secured before lowering the jack. Refitting is the reverse of the removal.

How to fit a clutch on a Suzuki Grand Vitara

VEHICLE: Suzuki Grand Vitara 1.6 petrol model with G16B engine code
LABOUR TIME: 3 HOURS
LUK CLUTCH INSTALLED: 622303160

This particular Suzuki Grand Vitara has covered close to 130,000 miles, with quite harsh use through its life. Because of this it is important that particular attention is made to the whole transmission system for possible wear.

The vehicle is the original 4×4 with mechanical four wheel engagement and the engine and transmission is installed longitudinal with the transfer box installed directly onto the gearbox. The clutch change on this model is quite straightforward, with the only intervention under the bonnet to disconnect the battery terminal.

A two-post ramp, a couple of transmission jacks and a special alignment tool are required for the repair and a good attitude to health and safety – due to the weight of the transmission – is a must!

Disconnect the gear levers

Once the battery terminal has been disconnected the next stage is to disconnect the gear shift levers from the gearbox, which takes place from inside the vehicle. This should be done before the vehicle is lifted. Firstly, remove the handbrake console by removing the two bolts on the rear side, then remove the front section of the console held in place by two further bolts on the side. You should then remove the clips on the side of the console between the seats.

How to fit a clutch on a Suzuki Grand Vitara

Access is now permitted for the 12mm bolts that retain the metal frame onto the main gear lever; this metal frame is to be removed to expose the gear selector.

How to fit a clutch on a Suzuki Grand Vitara

At that point the two side bolts should be removed and the selector disconnected completely. The same procedure is followed for the four wheel drive lever.

How to fit a clutch on a Suzuki Grand Vitara

The vehicle can now safely be lifted to move to the next stage of disconnecting the reverse gear plug, four wheel drive selector sensor, the wiring harness that passes over the gearbox and finally the earth cable; make sure you stow all of these safely and securely. Remove the external slave cylinder held in place by two 12mm bolts and stow securely before finally removing two bolts from the starter motor.

How to fit a clutch on a Suzuki Grand Vitara

Mark the position of the propshaft before removing it, as you don’t want a balance issue afterwards, and then disconnect from the gearbox spline, taking extra care not to damage the oil seal.
How to fit a clutch on a Suzuki Grand Vitara

The front section of the propshaft should remain fixed to the gearbox to avoid transmission oil leaks. Support the gearbox with the transmission jacks and remove the cross member support for the gearbox. Loosen the anti-roll bar, allowing it to hang so that this gives a clear space when removing the gearbox.

Lower the gearbox

Now for the health and safety part: with the gearbox supported by the transmission jacks and three sets of hands(!), remove the four bell housing bolts and carefully lower the gearbox to the ground.

Remove the old clutch cover and clutch plate. Check the bell housing for any debris and oil contamination and rectify before refitting the gearbox. The release bearing should always be changed during a clutch replacement; the release arm should be checked for smooth operation and for wear on the ball pivot.

Apply a small amount of HMPG to the release fork and install with the new release bearing.

How to fit a clutch on a Suzuki Grand Vitara

How to fit a clutch on a Suzuki Grand Vitara

How to fit a clutch on a Suzuki Grand Vitara

Check the flywheel for signs of heat stress, such as hair line fractures or cracks, and the surface of the flywheel should be checked to make sure it is within the manufacturer’s wear tolerance. If the surface of the flywheel is to be skimmed, make sure that the same amount is taken from the clutch bolting surface. Failure to check and rectify these areas may cause the clutch to operate incorrectly.

Before fitting the new clutch disc, make sure the input shaft is clean and free from any wear. In this case the spigot bearing was completely worn and noisy and was replaced. Smear a little high melting point grease on the input shaft splines then slide the new clutch plate up and down a couple of times, remove the plate and wipe any excess grease off.

Refitting the gearbox is the reversal of removal, remembering to refill the gearbox oil to the correct level when the gearbox is refitted.

For the latest in online support log on to www.repxpert.com.

MEET THEM AT MECHANEX

Schaeffler Automotive Aftermarket’s three quality brands – LuK, INA and FAG – will all be in attendance throughout 2015 at our MECHANEX trade shows.

Offering visitors the opportunity to talk to Schaeffler’s group of experienced experts who will be on hand to offer helpful demonstrations and workshop hints, attendees can also find out about the latest technologies that will soon be appearing in their workshop.

How to fit a clutch on a Suzuki Grand Vitara

VEHICLE: Suzuki Grand Vitara 1.6 petrol model with G16B engine code
LABOUR TIME: 3 HOURS
LUK CLUTCH INSTALLED: 622303160

This particular Suzuki Grand Vitara has covered close to 130,000 miles, with quite harsh use through its life. Because of this it is important that particular attention is made to the whole transmission system for possible wear.

The vehicle is the original 4×4 with mechanical four wheel engagement and the engine and transmission is installed longitudinal with the transfer box installed directly onto the gearbox. The clutch change on this model is quite straightforward, with the only intervention under the bonnet to disconnect the battery terminal.

A two-post ramp, a couple of transmission jacks and a special alignment tool are required for the repair and a good attitude to health and safety – due to the weight of the transmission – is a must!

Disconnect the gear levers

Once the battery terminal has been disconnected the next stage is to disconnect the gear shift levers from the gearbox, which takes place from inside the vehicle. This should be done before the vehicle is lifted. Firstly, remove the handbrake console by removing the two bolts on the rear side, then remove the front section of the console held in place by two further bolts on the side. You should then remove the clips on the side of the console between the seats.

How to fit a clutch on a Suzuki Grand Vitara

Access is now permitted for the 12mm bolts that retain the metal frame onto the main gear lever; this metal frame is to be removed to expose the gear selector.

How to fit a clutch on a Suzuki Grand Vitara

At that point the two side bolts should be removed and the selector disconnected completely. The same procedure is followed for the four wheel drive lever.

How to fit a clutch on a Suzuki Grand Vitara

The vehicle can now safely be lifted to move to the next stage of disconnecting the reverse gear plug, four wheel drive selector sensor, the wiring harness that passes over the gearbox and finally the earth cable; make sure you stow all of these safely and securely. Remove the external slave cylinder held in place by two 12mm bolts and stow securely before finally removing two bolts from the starter motor.

How to fit a clutch on a Suzuki Grand Vitara

Mark the position of the propshaft before removing it, as you don’t want a balance issue afterwards, and then disconnect from the gearbox spline, taking extra care not to damage the oil seal.
How to fit a clutch on a Suzuki Grand Vitara

The front section of the propshaft should remain fixed to the gearbox to avoid transmission oil leaks. Support the gearbox with the transmission jacks and remove the cross member support for the gearbox. Loosen the anti-roll bar, allowing it to hang so that this gives a clear space when removing the gearbox.

Lower the gearbox

Now for the health and safety part: with the gearbox supported by the transmission jacks and three sets of hands(!), remove the four bell housing bolts and carefully lower the gearbox to the ground.

Remove the old clutch cover and clutch plate. Check the bell housing for any debris and oil contamination and rectify before refitting the gearbox. The release bearing should always be changed during a clutch replacement; the release arm should be checked for smooth operation and for wear on the ball pivot.

Apply a small amount of HMPG to the release fork and install with the new release bearing.

How to fit a clutch on a Suzuki Grand Vitara

How to fit a clutch on a Suzuki Grand Vitara

How to fit a clutch on a Suzuki Grand Vitara

Check the flywheel for signs of heat stress, such as hair line fractures or cracks, and the surface of the flywheel should be checked to make sure it is within the manufacturer’s wear tolerance. If the surface of the flywheel is to be skimmed, make sure that the same amount is taken from the clutch bolting surface. Failure to check and rectify these areas may cause the clutch to operate incorrectly.

Before fitting the new clutch disc, make sure the input shaft is clean and free from any wear. In this case the spigot bearing was completely worn and noisy and was replaced. Smear a little high melting point grease on the input shaft splines then slide the new clutch plate up and down a couple of times, remove the plate and wipe any excess grease off.

Refitting the gearbox is the reversal of removal, remembering to refill the gearbox oil to the correct level when the gearbox is refitted.

For the latest in online support log on to www.repxpert.com.

MEET THEM AT MECHANEX

Schaeffler Automotive Aftermarket’s three quality brands – LuK, INA and FAG – will all be in attendance throughout 2015 at our MECHANEX trade shows.

Offering visitors the opportunity to talk to Schaeffler’s group of experienced experts who will be on hand to offer helpful demonstrations and workshop hints, attendees can also find out about the latest technologies that will soon be appearing in their workshop.