Category Archives: Peugeot

How to Replace the Rear Shocks on a Peugeot Partner

Shocking Results: How to Replace the Rear Shocks on a Peugeot Partner

KYB provides a walk-through of how to replace the rear shock absorbers on two van models: Citroen Berlingo and Peugeot 5008/Partner.

This fitting guide runs through the process for replacing rear shock absorbers on: Citroen Berlingo/Berlingo Multispace (04/2008 onwards), Peugeot Partner/Partner Tepee (04/2008 onwards) and Peugeot 5008 (06/2009 to 11/2013). There are just fewer than 300,000 of these vehicle models on the road in the UK. The estimated fitting time for front shock absorber replacement is up to 90 minutes per side.

Remove the spare tyre. For the Peugeot 5008, you can find the special access tool just below the lip of the boot wall.

Remove the protection shields and rubber straps from the axle.

On the right hand side, remove the heat shield above the exhaust, to give access to the coil spring. Use a compressor to remove the coil spring.

On the left hand side, use a handheld compressor to compress the coil spring, in order to remove it from the vehicle. Remove the bolts on the mounting plate above the shock absorber.

Remove the bottom bolt, then remove the shock absorber and mounting plate.

Remove the mounting plate from the shock absorber.

Attach the mounting plate to the top of the new shock absorber.

Ensure the alignment is at 90 ̊.

Reattach the shock absorber and mounting plate to the vehicle. Replace the coil springs and heat shield, followed by the axle protection shield and rubber straps. Finally, replace the spare tyre. KYB recommends that shock absorbers and coil springs are always fitted in axle pairs.


How to: Replace the Clutch on a Peugeot 206

How to: Replace the Clutch on a Peugeot 206

Schaeffler Expert Alistair Mason inspected a 2005 1.1L petrol Peugeot 206, which had covered more than 75,000 miles.

It was difficult to get the vehicle into gear, as the clutch was not fully disengaging and there was a ‘scraping’ noise emanating from the bell housing area, so a gearbox removal was advised and authorised.

For this repair, Alistair needed a two-post vehicle lift, transmission jack, engine support and clutch alignment tool. A gearbox removal should be a straightforward task for an independent technician.

Step-by-step procedure

With the vehicle placed on the ramp, open the bonnet and remove the air filter/box assembly, the battery and carrier, which gives good access to the top of the gearbox and bell housing area (see below).

Pictured: Top of Gearbox Area

Detach the multiplug from the reverse light switch, remove the earth lead connection from the top of the gearbox, and disconnect the clutch cable from the gearbox by pulling the cable forwards and unhooking from the arm. Next, undo the upper bell housing bolts and top starter motor bolt, then, at the rear of the gearbox, disconnect the three gear change linkage rods.

Before raising the vehicle lift to gain access to the underside, slacken the hub nuts for both front driveshafts.

Next, raise the lift and drain the gearbox oil, release both bottom ball joints from the front hub assemblies, pull the hub assemblies outwards and remove the outer CV joints. On the O/S/F driveshaft, the centre bearing also needs to be released, before removing both driveshafts from the vehicle and storing them safely.

Remove the starter motor retaining bolts and the engine speed sensor from the front of the bell housing and lower bell housing bolts, leaving two easily-accessible bolts to retain the gearbox until it can be removed.

With two transmission jacks, support both the engine and the gearbox. Use a ladder to reach the topside of the engine, and then remove the gearbox mounting. Lower the engine and gearbox assembly slightly, remove the final bell housing bolts, ease the gearbox away from the engine, and, once clear, lower the gearbox with the transmission jack and store safely.

On this occasion, with the gearbox removed, the fault was easily identified: some of the clutch diaphragm fingers had been ground away and snapped off (see below).

Pictured: Clutch Diaphragm

The release bearing was also inspected and was deemed unserviceable, as it had damage to the contact area and no lubrication in the bearing (see below).

Pictured: Release Bearing

There could be a few reasons for this fault:

  • The bearing coming into constant contact with the clutch, causing the bearing to get hot and seize, which can eminate from the driver resting their foot on the clutch pedal.
  • The release system’s alignment is not correct; the release fork lever bushes are worn and the release fork is twisted/bent.
  • The release bearing guide tube is worn, not allowing the release bearing to return correctly.

Clutch replacement is needed

Remove the old clutch, and remove the glaze from the flywheel by using Emory cloth and clean it with brake and clutch dust cleaner. Next, mount the new clutch plate onto the gearbox input shaft to ensure correct fitment (see below).

Pictured: Clutch Plate

Next, using a clutch alignment tool, mount the new clutch assembly onto the flywheel (see below).

Pictured: Flywheel

Next, ensure the clutch plate is facing the correct way, indicated by ‘Gearbox Side’ (or ‘Getriebe Seite’), then tighten the bolts evenly and sequentially, and finally, torque to the manufacturer’s specification.

The next task is to examine the release system. On this job, the release bearing was replaced, as it is part of the clutch kit. On closer inspection of the release fork, excessive wear was evident in the nylon bushes, as was slight wear on the fork itself. Therefore, the release fork and bushes were replaced, as was the release bearing guide tube (see below).

Pictured: Release Bearing Guide Tube

Apply a light smear of high melting point grease to the gearbox input shaft splines and wipe off any excess – in the areas where metal is running on nylon, no lubrication is required. Ensure both engine to gearbox alignment dowels are installed in the engine.

Ensure the clutch cable is operating smoothly, but be aware that it is always best practice to change it. In this instance, the self-adjusting clutch cable was replaced.

Using the transmission jack, ease the gearbox into position, locate the gearbox input shaft into the clutch plate, and then ease it onto the alignment dowels. Once in position, secure it with a bell housing bolt.

Installation is in reverse order of removal. Torque all bolts to the manufacturer’s specification and refill the gearbox with the correct quantity and specification of gearbox oil. Once the battery lead has been connected, reset all electrical systems. Finally, carry out a full road test to ensure a quality repair.

Job Done!

Clutch Replacement – Citroen C1

The Citroën C1 was created in 2005 from a joint project between PSA Peugeot Citroën and Toyota. This popular city car has sold over 64,000 models in the UK and is starting to become a regular sight in the aftermarket.

Replacing a clutch on the C1 can be a little tricky, but with the guidance of LuK the whole process will become much easier. Nothing out of the ordinary is needed to complete the job, the only special tools required are a transmission jack, an engine support beam and a long axle stand. A two-post ramp was used in this example as a four-post ramp may not provide enough clearance.

For safety reasons its considered best practice to disconnect the battery earth lead before commencing work. If the vehicle has alloy wheels it may be fitted with anti-theft wheel bolts, so make sure you have the key before you start.

Disconnect the battery cables, remove the support clamp and lift the battery out. Undo the small satellite fuse box (not forgetting the hidden bolt at the rear (pictured below)) and stow it to one side.

Release the attached wiring harness from the battery tray and remove the tray, making sure you find the hidden bolt through the hole on the tray (pictured below).

Remove the securing clips on the gear linkage cables (pictured below) and the large tension spring. Undo and release the clutch cable from the transmission and stow it to one side. Unclip the reverse light switch and remove the bracket.

Install the support beam and undo the upper bell housing bolts and the starter motor upper bolt. Remove the gearbox supporting bracket (pictured below).

Remove the gearbox cover plate
Raise the vehicle and remove the N/S/F wheel. Remove the gearbox cover plate above the exhaust and disconnect the oxygen sensor. Drain the gearbox oil and undo the lower arm (pictured below) castle nut and pin and release the N/S drive shaft.

Undo the final starter motor bolt (pictured below, left) and remove the rear gearbox mounting (pictured below, right). Finally remove the remaining lower bell housing bolts and, while supporting the gearbox, pull it back to access the clutch and release bearing.

  

With the clutch removed, check to see if the vehicle has a Dual Mass Flywheel (DMF) fitted. If it has it will need to be checked for signs of heat stress and evidence of grease loss. The DMF should also be tested for freeplay and rock between the primary and secondary masses – LuK tool number 400 0080 10 is specifically designed for this purpose on all LuK manufactured DMFs. Full instructions and tolerance data for all LuK DMFs are contained on a CD which comes with this special tool.

Clean the first motion shaft splines and any debris from the bell housing (especially important when a release bearing has failed). Put a small dab of high melting point grease (not a copper-based product) on the first motion shaft splines and make sure the new driven plate slides freely back and forth. This not only spreads the grease evenly but also makes sure you have the correct kit. Wipe any excess grease off the shaft and driven plate hub. Using a universal alignment tool and checking the driven plate is the correct way round (note ‘Getriebe Seite’ is German for ‘Gearbox Side’), the clutch can be bolted to the flywheel evenly and sequentially.

Before fitting the gearbox make sure the locating dowels are in place and not damaged, refit any that have become dislodged. Inspect the release fork, cross shaft and bushes for wear and tear and refit the gearbox. Make sure the gearbox bell housing bolts are secured before lowering the jack. Refitting is the reverse of the removal.

Clutch Replacement – Peugeot 307 SW

Introduced in 2001 and awarded ‘European Car of the Year’ in 2002, the Peugeot 307 certainly made an impact during its six year production span. After selling more than 314,000 vehicles until it was replaced by the 308 in 2007, the Peugeot has become quite popular in the UK aftermarket scene which makes it a prime candidate for a ‘step by step’ guide.

A clutch replacement on the Peugeot can be a little tricky but with the guidance of LuK the whole process will become much easier. Nothing out of the ordinary is needed to complete the job, the only special tools required are a transmission jack, an engine support cradle and a long axle stand. A twopost ramp was used in this example, however a four-post ramp may not provide enough clearance.

For safety reasons its considered best practice to disconnect the battery earth lead before commencing work. If the vehicle has alloy wheels it may be fitted with anti-theft wheel bolts, so make sure you have the key before you start.

Open the bonnet, remove the battery cover and disconnect the battery. Remove the upper air filter housing by releasing the jubilee clip and the four screws (pictured below).

Lift off the upper section and release the lower section by giving it a sharp pull upwards (pictured below).

Raise the vehicle and remove both front road wheels. Remove the N/S wheel arch liner to access one of the bolts (pictured below) securing the metal battery tray. Using a relevant tool pull out the plastic clips securing the liner and remove the mud flap (if fitted) then pull out the liner and undo the bolt.

Lower the vehicle and unclip the electrical harness attached to the battery tray. Undo the fixings securing the plastic shield at the back of the tray and lift it out. Undo the remaining bolts and lift the tray out. Disconnect the reverse light switch and the crankshaft electrical connectors. Unbolt the earth point (pictured below) attached to the top of the gearbox and undo the two starter motor allen key bolts and stow it to one side.

Unbolt the slave cylinder and the attached bracket and stow them to one side. Using a relevant tool pop off the ends of the gear selector cables and release the cable supports by pushing the metal fingers (pictured below) in with a small screw driver. Support the engine with a suitable cradle and remove the gearbox mounting bracket by undoing the single nut and the surrounding fixings. Lift out the bush and the support bracket and for extra clearance undo the bracket on top of the gearbox and the gold threaded bolt sticking out of the gearbox. Remove the accessible upper bell housing bolts.

Raise the vehicle and drain the transmission fluid, not forgetting to refit the plug. Remove the “R” clips and the hub nuts on both sides. Split the lower ball joints and swing out the struts to release them, push out the drive shafts from the hubs (these should slide out easily). Slide the nearside driveshaft out from the gearbox. Remove the offside driveshaft by releasing the centre support bearing by removing the two securing bolts (pictured below) then slide the shaft clear of the gearbox.

Raise the vehicle and support the gearbox from below using a transmission jack. Remove the remaining lower bell housing bolts and slide the gearbox back slightly and twist it away from the sub-frame exercising care (beware of the radiator coolant pipe). The gearbox can now be lowered.

With the clutch removed, check the flywheel or Dual Mass Flywheel (if it has one fitted) for signs of heat stress and evidence of grease loss. The DMF should also be tested for free play and rock between the primary and secondary masses, LuK tool number 400 0080 10 is specifically designed for this purpose on all LuK manufactured DMF’s. Full instructions and tolerance data for all LuK DMFs are contained on a CD which comes with this special tool.

Clean the first motion shaft splines and any debris from the bell housing (especially important when a release bearing has failed). When comparing the new and old release bearings on this model you may find that they are slightly different. This is perfectly normal if you look at the picture, and the new bearing will work perfectly so don’t worry about fitting it (pictured below).

Put a small dab of high melting point grease (not a copper-based product) on the first motion shaft splines and make sure the new driven plate slides freely back and forth. This not only spreads the grease evenly but also makes sure you have the correct kit. Wipe any excess grease off the shaft and driven plate hub. Using a universal alignment tool and checking the driven plate is the correct way round (note “Getriebe Seite” is German for “Gearbox Side”) the clutch can be bolted to the flywheel evenly and sequentially.

Before fitting the gearbox make sure the locating dowels are in place and not damaged. Refit any that have become dislodged and refit the gearbox. Make sure the gearbox bell housing bolts are secured before lowering the jack. Refitting is the reverse of the removal.

How to change a clutch on a Peugeot Expert

With over 50,000 Peugeot Experts on the UK roads today, this handy guide from LuK for replacing a pull type clutch on the 2.0hdi engine should help to cut the recommended repair time of seven hours down to just over three.

For this job we used a two-post ramp and two transmission jacks. If the vehicle has alloy wheels fitted, then check the locking tool is available before starting any work. From underneath the bonnet, first disconnect the battery earth terminal and stow safely.

Remove the air filter housing and remove two nuts that hold the front section of the air hose to the bracket fitted on the starter motor. The front section of the hose can then be stowed securely by a bungee rope around the slam panel so as to not get damaged. Remove the cap that covers the release fork and slave cylinder.

Disconnect the gear change selector cables (one on the top and one on the side) of the gearbox by pressing in the push button on each cable and they will pop out of position. Stow to the side.

Twist the cylinder

Remove the support bracket for the slave cylinder and then twist the cylinder one and a quarter turns to the left to release from the bayonet connection on the gearbox. Stow inside the front bumper. You do not need to remove or disconnect the hydraulic pipe. Remove the starter motor secured by three bolts; two also hold the air hose bracket.

Remove the top bell housing bolts and the gearbox mount and bracket. Remove the earth cable and disconnect the speed sensor and reverse light switches.

Raise the vehicle and remove both front wheels. Remove the near side wheel arch liner. Drain the gearbox oil. Disconnect the pipe from the intercooler to the turbo, you do not need to remove this as it can be positioned out of the way; it is a good idea, however, to either block the pipe with a suitable bung or, in our case, it was easy enough to flex the pipe in an upright position so no oil leaked.

Undo both ball joints and separate. Carefully pull the near-side drive shaft from the gearbox. Release the offside drive shaft bearing support and then remove carefully from the gearbox.

You do not need to remove the sub-frame for this repair as the gearbox can be moved towards the near side wheel arch, allowing enough room to change the clutch and DMF. In some cases, the bolt heads securing the sub frame can be sheared, which can then be very difficult to remove. Support the engine and gearbox with the transmission jacks. Remove the remaining bell housing bolts and the gearbox can then be separated from the engine. As this is a pull type gearbox, the release fork will separate itself from the bearing as the gearbox is removed. Carefully move the gearbox towards the nearside wheel arch.

Check the DMF

Remove the worn clutch, taking note that the release bearing is attached to the pressure cover. With the clutch removed, check the dual mass flywheel (DMF) for signs of heat stress and evidence of grease loss. The DMF should also be tested for free play and rock between the primary and secondary masses; LuK tool number 400 0080 10 is specifically designed for this purpose on all LuK manufactured DMFs. Full instructions and tolerance data for all LuK DMFs are contained on a CD, which comes with this special tool. Check the release mechanism for damage. Clean the first motion shaft splines and any debris from the bell housing, which is especially important when a release bearing has failed. Put a small dab of high-melting point grease – not a copper-based product – on the first motion shaft splines and make sure the new driven plate slides freely back and forth.

This not only spreads the grease evenly, but also makes sure you have the correct kit. Wipe any excess grease off the shaft and driven plate hub. Using a universal alignment tool and checking the driven plate is the correct way round (note: “Getriebe Seite” is German for “Gearbox Side”) the clutch can be bolted to the flywheel evenly and sequentially.

Refitting the gearbox is the reverse of removal, however, the release bearing must be attached to the release fork – do not locate the bearing into the clutch cover. Once the gearbox is back in place, the release bearing can be snapped into the cover using an appropriate tool through the clutch cylinder aperture.

How to fit a clutch on a Citroen C5

RECOMMENDED LABOUR TIME: 6 HOURS LUK PART NUMBER: 623304100

This specific vehicle is fitted with a dual mass flywheel (DMF) and a pull type clutch which, even today, can present some issues when being installed.

In addition to the Citroën C5, this guide is also relevant to some passenger car and light commercial vehicle applications from both Peugeot and Fiat. One thing to always remember, whatever the application, is that it is essential to replace the fork and pivot with each clutch replacement.

For this repair we used a two-post ramp, engine support, long axle stand, transmission jack and an alignment tool for the clutch driven plate. If the vehicle is fitted with alloy wheels then you should ensure the locking nut is available before starting the repair. For safety purposes, also disconnect the battery earth lead.

Better access

Remove the engine covers, disconnect the air filter hoses, remove the air filter housing and base plate and the electronic multi-plugs. The auxiliary fuse box should be removed to allow better access to the top of the transmission. Disconnect the gear change cables from the gear change selector mechanism on the top of the gearbox and then remove the mechanism.

The slave cylinder is removed next and should be carefully cable-tied clear to one side (there is no need to disconnect the hydraulic pipe).

Remove the starter motor, top bell housing bolts and the gearbox mounting and bracket. Disconnect the speedo and reverse light multi-plugs and then install the engine support beam.

Remove the wheel arch cover

Raise the vehicle, remove both front wheels and carefully pull the ABS and brake pad warning sensor wires from their securing rubbers on both sides. Remove the wheel arch cover from the O/S. From under the vehicle remove the engine undershield and disconnect both bottom ball joints and separate. Drain the gearbox oil, remembering to replace the drain plug afterwards.

Remove the pipes from the intercooler to the turbo and their securing brackets attached to the gearbox. Remove the gearbox inspection plate and the three bolts for the gear linkage support bracket.

You should then disconnect the brackets securing the air conditioning hoses and stow clear to one side.

Carefully pull the O/S drive shaft out of the gearbox, undo the N/S drive shaft bearing support and pull the drive shaft out of the gearbox.

Slacken the two sub frame bolts on the O/S and remove the two bolts on the N/S. Support the gearbox with a suitable gearbox jack and then disconnect the remaining bell housing bolts (with this pull type gearbox the release fork will separate from the bearing when the gearbox is removed). The gearbox can then be gently lowered to the floor by rotating slightly to allow it to clear the sub frame.

It is important to note that the old release bearing will be attached to the pressure cover and this is where most will go wrong as the new release bearing, prior to fitting the new clutch, will be pushed into the clutch cover. This should never be the case. The release bearing MUST be installed to the release fork first.


On this model it is necessary to check the serviceability of the DMF. There should be no more than 15 – 30mm of free rotational movement between the primary and secondary masses. If there is any movement greater than this, or no movement at all, then it is recommended that the DMF is replaced. On this occasion the radial tolerance was within specifications but the axial tolerance (1.6mm is allowed) was outside its limit (2.1mm) so the DMF was replaced.

Refitting the gearbox is the reverse of removal, however the new release bearing will have to be attached to the new release fork. Do not locate the bearing back into the cover.

With the gearbox back in place the release bearing can then be snapped into the cover with the aid of an appropriate lever through the clutch cylinder aperture.

You should hear a nice healthy ‘click’ as the bearing locates into the clutch cover. To ensure the bearing is connected fully, carefully operate the fork with the lever in the other direction to operate the clutch. As there is no gearbox level plug, the gearbox is topped back up through the reverse plunger aperture with 1.8 litres of VM specified transmission oil.

For the latest in online support log on to

MEET THEM AT MECHANEX

Schaeffler Automotive Aftermarket’s three quality brands – LuK, INA and FAG – will all be in attendance throughout 2015 at our MECHANEX trade shows.

Offering visitors the opportunity to talk to Schaeffler’s group of experienced experts who will be on hand to offer helpful demonstrations and workshop hints, attendees can also find out about the latest technologies that will soon be appearing in their workshop.

Belt system maintenance – Peugeot 206 2.0l HDi

The jobcard says it’s time for a scheduled timing belt change on the Synchronous Belt Drive System (SBDS) of a Peugeot 206 2.0 Litre HDi. Experience tells you that to replace the belt alone is not enough. Preventive maintenance techniques and good workshop practice dictates that the job requires a belt kit, rather than just a belt.

After a quick check of the manufacturer’s recommended procedure, you are ready to proceed. There are two common scenarios:

Scenario 1

No pre-installation checks

The belt kit is supplied with instructions and the job is similar to other installations on similar models. The installation takes place with no unforeseen issues until the engine is wound over in accordance with the recommended procedure. It is at this point that you notice that the belt is running ‘off the pulley’. It looks like ‘a belt problem’. Another belt is selected, the same procedure followed, but the result is the same. The belt is running ‘off the pulley’. They are obviously from a bad batch and as a considerable amount of time has already been wasted, it’s time to call the motor factor and make your complaint.

Scenario 2

Checking for ‘known issues’

The belt kit is supplied with instructions and the job is similar to other installations on similar models. Before the procedure takes place, you decide to play it safe and check to see if the supplier has identified any ‘known issues’. However, this is a Gates belt so there is no need to call the motor factor. Fitting instructions are included inside Gates belt kit boxes. In addition, the numbers of any Technical Bulletins (TB) that relate to known issues associated with the particular application are included. From this it is possible to see that TB No.045 is relevant. On the Gates website (www.gates.com/technical) you can benefit from the experiences of other mechanics who may have encountered an installation issue or two, when installing any of the belts from the range. There is no need to log in or register.

Towards the end of a long list of technical bulletins, you see TB.045. The PDF is entitled ‘PSA diesel’. After downloading, “Tensioner/kit installation on PSA diesel engines” explains clearly that there are potential issues when installing the tensioner included in the kit.

Indeed, there is one very common installation error that must be avoided, or else premature belt failure is inevitable.

Gates has identified several instances where the tensioner pulley has been incorrectly positioned over the mounting stud. TB N o .45 states:

“If the inside of the tensioner front plate rests against the front edge of the mounting stud, the result will be that the tensioner pulley is not sitting square over the stud, EVEN after the fixing bolt has been correctly torqued. This will lead to belt misalignment.”

In short, the belt will appear to be running ‘off the pulley’. This is a misalignment issue. You take the appropriate action to avoid the issue and the job is completed without any problems.

Preparation makes perfect

Good preparation plus the correct equipment and parts will ensure the job is completed in the shortest possible time to the greatest effect.

Consider the manufacturing issues. Gates is one of the world’s largest manufacturers of belts and tensioners. Given the number of quality checks made during the various construction stages, manufacturing errors are extremely rare and bad batches of manufactured timing belts are unprecedented.

Consider the installation issues. Time costs money at every level and there is no doubt which of the two scenarios:

a) Would’ve taken the most time;

b) Would’ve have caused the customer the greatest amount of inconvenience and might have cost the garage a significant amount of rectification time.

Unnecessary errors

It is good workshop practice to replace the belt and tensioners at the same time as the belt at a scheduled change. In over 90% of cases, belt kits are installed as part of a standard drive system service. Installation errors like the one highlighted in TB.45 are repeated up and down the country every day.

These errors are unnecessary. They can easily be eradicated with a preliminary check with the technical information available through your supplier. If necessary, ask the motor factor if the belt supplier is aware of any known issues with a particular belt installation.

One final issue remains…

By now, the water pump will have done the same amount of work as the belt and tensioners, while the cost of the labour has been covered by installing the belt kit. Gates says it’s a risk not to replace the water pump when the kit is installed and even supplies belt kits with the correct water pump included.

How to fit a clutch on a Citroen C5

RECOMMENDED LABOUR TIME: 6 HOURS LUK PART NUMBER: 623304100

This specific vehicle is fitted with a dual mass flywheel (DMF) and a pull type clutch which, even today, can present some issues when being installed.

In addition to the Citroën C5, this guide is also relevant to some passenger car and light commercial vehicle applications from both Peugeot and Fiat. One thing to always remember, whatever the application, is that it is essential to replace the fork and pivot with each clutch replacement.

For this repair we used a two-post ramp, engine support, long axle stand, transmission jack and an alignment tool for the clutch driven plate. If the vehicle is fitted with alloy wheels then you should ensure the locking nut is available before starting the repair. For safety purposes, also disconnect the battery earth lead.

Better access

Remove the engine covers, disconnect the air filter hoses, remove the air filter housing and base plate and the electronic multi-plugs. The auxiliary fuse box should be removed to allow better access to the top of the transmission. Disconnect the gear change cables from the gear change selector mechanism on the top of the gearbox and then remove the mechanism.

The slave cylinder is removed next and should be carefully cable-tied clear to one side (there is no need to disconnect the hydraulic pipe).

Remove the starter motor, top bell housing bolts and the gearbox mounting and bracket. Disconnect the speedo and reverse light multi-plugs and then install the engine support beam.

Remove the wheel arch cover

Raise the vehicle, remove both front wheels and carefully pull the ABS and brake pad warning sensor wires from their securing rubbers on both sides. Remove the wheel arch cover from the O/S. From under the vehicle remove the engine undershield and disconnect both bottom ball joints and separate. Drain the gearbox oil, remembering to replace the drain plug afterwards.

Remove the pipes from the intercooler to the turbo and their securing brackets attached to the gearbox. Remove the gearbox inspection plate and the three bolts for the gear linkage support bracket.

You should then disconnect the brackets securing the air conditioning hoses and stow clear to one side.

Carefully pull the O/S drive shaft out of the gearbox, undo the N/S drive shaft bearing support and pull the drive shaft out of the gearbox.

Slacken the two sub frame bolts on the O/S and remove the two bolts on the N/S. Support the gearbox with a suitable gearbox jack and then disconnect the remaining bell housing bolts (with this pull type gearbox the release fork will separate from the bearing when the gearbox is removed). The gearbox can then be gently lowered to the floor by rotating slightly to allow it to clear the sub frame.

It is important to note that the old release bearing will be attached to the pressure cover and this is where most will go wrong as the new release bearing, prior to fitting the new clutch, will be pushed into the clutch cover. This should never be the case. The release bearing MUST be installed to the release fork first.


On this model it is necessary to check the serviceability of the DMF. There should be no more than 15 – 30mm of free rotational movement between the primary and secondary masses. If there is any movement greater than this, or no movement at all, then it is recommended that the DMF is replaced. On this occasion the radial tolerance was within specifications but the axial tolerance (1.6mm is allowed) was outside its limit (2.1mm) so the DMF was replaced.

Refitting the gearbox is the reverse of removal, however the new release bearing will have to be attached to the new release fork. Do not locate the bearing back into the cover.

With the gearbox back in place the release bearing can then be snapped into the cover with the aid of an appropriate lever through the clutch cylinder aperture.

You should hear a nice healthy ‘click’ as the bearing locates into the clutch cover. To ensure the bearing is connected fully, carefully operate the fork with the lever in the other direction to operate the clutch. As there is no gearbox level plug, the gearbox is topped back up through the reverse plunger aperture with 1.8 litres of VM specified transmission oil.

For the latest in online support log on to www.repxpert.com.

MEET THEM AT MECHANEX

Schaeffler Automotive Aftermarket’s three quality brands – LuK, INA and FAG – will all be in attendance throughout 2015 at our MECHANEX trade shows.

Offering visitors the opportunity to talk to Schaeffler’s group of experienced experts who will be on hand to offer helpful demonstrations and workshop hints, attendees can also find out about the latest technologies that will soon be appearing in their workshop.

How do Stop-Start systems work?

The last few years have seen the introduction of Stop-Start systems by many manufacturers across various vehicle models to improve fuel consumption and reduce exhaust emissions.

One of the main problems the introduction of Stop-Start systems has caused is that when the starter is operated the voltage in the vehicle’s electrical system can drop. In normal circumstances this is not a problem, the vehicle is not usually in “driving mode” and it doesn’t matter if some of the vehicle electrical systems do not function during starter motor operation (exterior lights, heating & air conditioning and audio systems, for example). However, during driving this is not acceptable for reasons of safety and driver convenience.

To counter this problem most systems use an additional power supply to ensure that voltage-critical equipment will not stop operating during starter motor operation. For some models this consists of a large capacitor that is charged by the alternator using engine power, or kinetic energy generated during deceleration and braking.

Considerable thought has been given to the safety mechanisms; most, if not all, Stop-Start systems will not operate if any of the doors or the bonnet is open and will only operate if sufficient vacuum is available to ensure the normal operation of the braking system.
As the use of Stop-Start technology is increasingly adopted, there are now as many systems as there are manufacturers, but they can be categorised as follows:

  • Those using a “conventional” starter motor
  • Those using a combined starter motor/alternator

Although some models use a conventional starter motor for cold start and Stop-Start operation, it is usually modified to ensure it can withstand the extra use it will encounter. However, the time taken to start the engine with this system is thought by some to be too long so other models are using a different approach.
Battery technology is also changing, with the extra starting cycles requiring a more robust battery construction. Absorbent glass matt (AGM) batteries, Gel batteries or the slightly cheaper enhanced flooded batteries (EFB) variants can be found in most vehicles with Stop-Start systems. Replacement of these batteries may necessitate programming of the vehicle’s computer system to allow the battery degradation process to be monitored. On many models the Stop-Start system will be disabled for up to 24 hours following battery disconnection or replacement to allow the battery condition to be evaluated.

Which Stop-Start Application Do They Use?
Toyota Yaris

The Stop-Start system of the Toyota Yaris has its starter motor in constant engagement with the flywheel ring gear and then the ring gear is connected to the engine flywheel with a one way clutch. This, together with recognition of the engine’s static crankshaft position, allows instantaneous ignition of the correct cylinder, thereby reducing starting time.

It is interesting to note that the number of starter motor operations is recorded and the calculated “end of starter lifespan” is indicated by a flashing warning lamp on the instrument panel. After replacement of the starter motor the counter has to be reset.

PSA group

Using a conventional type of starter motor for cold start, the Peugeot/Citroen group employs a combined starter motor and alternator assembly (so called reversible alternator) for the Stop-Start system. Connected to the engine crankshaft with the auxiliary drive belt, it provides silent operation and short starting time.

Unlike conventional alternators, diodes are not used; instead voltage rectification and motor operation use metal–oxide–semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs). Presently, it would appear that it is only the “e-HDi” models that use the aforementioned capacitor.

3 Essential Items That You’ll Need When Servicing Stop-Start Systems

Starters & Alternators 

Used in many modern vehicles, StARS (Stop start Alternator Reversible System) consists of a reversible alternator that replaces the conventional alternator and starter motor. The reversible alternator provides the function of alternator and starter combined with the new design allowing the conversion of electrical energy into mechanical energy, and visa-versa.

StARS works similar to the conventional alternator where the later applications would have the charge rate controlled by the vehicle ECU (computer controlled and smart charge systems). The new variation now has a separate ECU which administers the reversible alternator and the vehicle’s engine.
When the vehicle is slowed down by the user the ECU analyses the speed of the car and if/when the speed falls under 5mph the ECU switches off the engine. Once the brake pedal is released the ECU then gives an order to start the engine again. The reversible alternator plays the part of the starter motor to achieve this.

The system is designed to work in 5 phases:
1. The vehicle is switched on and the ECU will crank/start the engine. This is achieved by the battery providing electrical energy and the reversible alternator then acts as a starter motor to help crank the engine.

2. During normal driving (when the vehicle is not being slowed down) the reversible alternator then acts as a conventional alternator by converting the mechanical energy into electrical energy and charging the battery.

3. Once the vehicle speed has been reduced below 5mph by braking the StARS ECU gives a command to stop the engine.

4. Once the brake pedal has been released the StARS ECU then gives a command to start the engine again. The battery provides electrical energy and the reversible alternator plays the part of the starter motor and cranks the engine.

5. The vehicle is switched off and the ECU will stop the engine

AUTOELECTRO provides a whole array of replacement starter motors and alternators for modern Stop-Start systems and applications.

Servicing Data 

AUTODATA has enhanced its online product offering to include technical information on vehicles with Stop-Start technology.
The technical information provided by Autodata on its online system enables technicians to identify the specific location of key elements such as the main battery, additional battery and the Stop-Start capacitor.

Procedures for disconnecting and reconnecting each element are clearly explained along with additional information for servicing the system.

Replacement Batteries
EXIDE has expanded its coverage of the UK car parc with new AGM and ECM batteries. The new products cover vehicles from VW, Audi, Toyota, Ford and a slew of other brands.
Exide’s AGM batteries are claimed to have around three times the lifecycle durability of standard batteries. Parts of “matching quality”, they are designed for cars with Start-Stop and regenerative braking systems. They are also used in standard vehicles to increase endurance and performance.

AGM battery coverage: Audi A1, A4, A5 and Q5; BMW 5, 6, 7, X5 and X6; VW Golf, Polo and Touareg; Chrysler Voyager; Dodge Caliber; Jeep Cherokee and many others.

ECM battery coverage: Ford Fiesta, Galaxy, Focus, Mondeo, B-Max, C-Max and S-Max; Toyota iQ; Mazda CX-5 and a range of other models.

Diagnostic Troubleshooting – the pitfalls of ‘diagnosis by fault code’

Recently we had a visit from a Peugeot 206 that arrived at the workshop with a stallingcomplaint. The owner explainedthat when she came to a halt on a roundabout or in stationary traffic, after 10 seconds or so the engine would start running ‘lumpy’ and then cut out. The car had been taken to a number of garages where various parts had been changed but the problem still existed.

The Peugeot engine

First things first, I took a look under the bonnet and all seemed to be in order so it was time to take the car out on the road. I didn’t have to wait too long to notice the problem myself, however after coming to a halt the car restarted straight away. In order to investigate further I decided to take the car on an extended test drive to see if its performance was affected in any other way. Although the car did perform well it was slightly sluggish at the top end so I made sure to double check that the cutting-out was still occurring before taking the car into my workshop to have a proper look.

Back in the workshop

Using the scan tool first, no DTCs were logged. I then checked the serial data and, again, all appeared to be as it should. The 206 is a car I see on a regular basis, mainly for reboot maintenance, so at this point I decided to look at the basics in a little more depth. The air filter and air intake pipes were checked, and despite their clean appearance, the air filter looked like it needed replacing. The car stalled whilst in my workshop and appeared to be running ‘lumpyish’ before cutting out.

The fuel pressure test

With scope in hand my attention was now drawn to the 12 volt power supply coming from a multi-purpose relay which is mounted under the ECU. Removing the ECU usually uncovers a damp and dirt trap; this is exactly what I found so needless to say there was a bit of cleaning required. After disconnecting the relay, checking the pins and cleaning the sockets the connection was sound and the 12 volt supply was all in working order. I then restarted the engine, allowing it to run, but once again the engine began to sound lumpy and cut out. This was strange but I could now tell that the engine did not have an electrical supply problem. The earth path was checked for possible high resistance (which can cause running problems) but there were no troubles there either.

It was now time to move on to the idle air control valve, throttle position sensor, the map sensor and the infamous Lambda sensor. I checked the 5v first and all was sound with that.

Time for a rethink

The next check was the mapping sensor and this test proved to be the breakthrough that I was looking for. This sensor is a ‘digital type’ and is much faster than the old analogue type. With the engine running I attempted to open the throttle fully. The engine RPM rose and then gradually fell before cutting out as if it had run out of petrol. After conducting the test three times, the output of the mapping sensor frequently rose accordingly with the engine RPM, suggesting that there was no problem in this area.

Now I finally had something concrete to go on: fuel flow and pressure regulation. This was a very strange situation as fuel supply problems normally occur in the power band, which would lead to a severe drivability problem – lack of power. However, I was not entirely happy with the top-end performance so felt it was time to carry out a test on the fuel pump.

Testing the fuel pump

Firstly I went to look around the fuel pod for the pressure regulator, but it was nowhere to be seen!The rail had both supply and return pipes fitted, so the only other place it could have been fitted is in the fuel pump return. These pumps are fitted in the tank underneath the rear seat and I intended to carry out a two-fold test: the first was to connect the fuel pressure gauge to the return flow; and the second was to connect the scope to the 12v supply and also use the ground wire to the pump.

Fuel pump

With the engine running and the fuel pressure reading under 2 bar, the voltage was stable at 12.8 volts, however the fuel pressure started to drop rapidly and the engine started to run lumpy although the voltage still remained stable. Once the car cut out, the voltage went down and shut off the relay (as it should). This test was carried out three times.

I had now reached my decision that the fuel pump was at fault and I would remove the pump for a more thorough investigation. I couldn’t see any damage or blockage – the regulator was fitted to the pump on the return circuit and was of a ‘fired-type’ and the pump speed was varied to generate the pressure. Finally I had something positive to report to the customer!

I replaced the fuel pump with a quality Bosch replacement, the car was then retested and the problem was solved.

Every so often a problem job like this will come knocking where there are no DTC’s logged and the fact that it turned out to be a faulty fuel pump was very strange indeed. In the past I have often come across fuelling issues – which usually result in a lack of power or non-starters – and in some cases a DTC would be logged. In the case of BMW in particular, at least three vehicles were down on power and in all cases the fuel pump proved to be at fault.

Andy’s Final Thoughts 

It was obvious to me that my new customer, like others before her had fallen into the hands of what I describe as ‘Fault Code Jockey’s’. By this I mean that you’ll often read adverts in the local paper saying: “We have the latest in diagnostic equipment that can pin-point any fault”, however If that was the case I would be a millionaire by now!

Every aspect of a fault must be reviewed and tested and such a job can be very challenging. As such, knowledge is not only needed but in a lot of cases it is also gained. Using BMW as an example, a faulty fuel pump can log a DTC of ‘lean fuel mixture’ and ‘Lambda sensor’ but that doesn’t automatically mean you have found the problem and doesn’t even guarantee that there is a base to start with. Therefore it should be remembered that regardless of how committed you may be, there is always room for improvement!