Category Archives: Nissan

Nissan 4.0L Accessory Belt Noise – A Technical Tip from Gates

Under certain operating conditions, some Nissan light trucks and SUVs equipped with the 4.0L VQ40 engine may exhibit belt noise. The noise may be caused by improper belt tension, pulley misalignment or a combination of both. As a result, Gates introduced the 38378K Solution Kit to remedy the tension issue apparent in the OE Nissan tensioner. The OE has also determined that under certain circumstances the power steering pump pulley may be misaligned causing belt squeak in addition to an improperly tensioned belt. Therefore, before starting a repair it is advised to check the alignment of the drive belt pulleys, specifically the power steering pump pulley.

Step 1:

To check for proper power steering pump pulley alignment, first remove the drive belt. Using the Gates DriveAlign laser alignment device (91006), check for correct alignment between the power steering pump pulley and the crankshaft vibration damper. Alternatively a straight edge may be used if an alignment tool is unavailable.

  • If the power steering pump pulley is not in proper alignment, proceed with step 2.
  • If the power steering pump pulley is in proper alignment in relation to the crankshaft, proceed with step 3.

Step 2:

To perform adjustment of the power steering pump:

  • To allow access to the power steering pump mounting bolts, loosen the three bolts securing the heat shield to the right exhaust manifold.

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  • Loosen but do not remove the two bolts securing the power steering pump to the front of the engine (Fig. 1).

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  • From the right front fender well, loosen but do not remove the two bolts securing the pump to the engine (Fig. 2).

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  • Finger tighten the bolts in the following sequence: Front bolts, side bolts.
  •  To ensure the pulley is aligned properly the following sequence and torque values must be adhered to when securing the pump (Fig. 1 and 2):
  1.  Front lower bolt: 48 Ft. Lbs.
  2. Rear side bolt: 48 Ft. Lbs.
  3. Rear front bolt: 48 Ft. Lbs.
  4. Upper front bolt: 23 Ft. Lbs.
  •  Secure the bolts for the right side exhaust manifold heat shield.

Step 3:

Install the new tensioner and accessory drive belt from the Gates Solution Kit 38378K.

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Step 4:

Test vehicle operation to ensure the noise is eliminated.

Clutch replacement – Nissan Primera 2.0

The Sunderland built Nissan Primera – in its third generation (P12) guise– has been with us since 2002, where it quickly forged a reputation as a quality and reliable car. These continued to be sold in the UK until production came to an end in 2008 but they are still proving a popular vehicle in the UK aftermarket, with over 40,000 vehicles on the road.

No special tools are required for the procedure. The only additional tools needed are a transmission jack, an engine support cradle and a long axle stand. A two-post ramp was used in this example however it is recommended that a four-post ramp is not used as it may not provide enough clearance. For the sake of safety it’s considered best practice to disconnect the battery earth lead before commencing work. If the vehicle has alloy wheels it may be fitted with anti-theft wheel bolts, so make sure you have the key before you start.

Open the bonnet and disconnect the battery earth lead. Disconnect the Mass Air Flow (MAF) sensor (pictured below) and unclip the harness attached to the air filter housing.

Disconnect the large breather pipe connected to the housing and slacken the jubilee clip attaching it to the inlet manifold. Undo the single bolt securing the housing to the vehicle body and disconnect the small breather connecting the housing and the gearbox. Lift out the complete air filter housing assembly.

Remove the gear selector cables by removing the ‘R’ clips (pictured below) and the washers securing them in place.

Lift off the cables and disconnect the reverse light switch. Remove the two bolts securing the slave cylinder (pictured below) to the gearbox and stow it to one side.

Remove the two bolts securing the harness support brackets on top of the gearbox and the support bracket securing the hydraulic pipe (pictured below) and stow them to one side. Undo the top starter motor bolt and the accessible top bell housing bolts.

Fit the engine support beam and remove the four bolts securing the gearbox mounting bracket to the gearbox.

On the up

Raise the vehicle to a comfortable working height and remove both front wheels and the nearside wheel arch liner. Raise the ramp further and remove the engine under tray. Disconnect the earth connection (pictured below) on the gearbox and drain the gearbox oil, remembering to replace the drain plug afterwards.

Remove the bolts securing the rear cross member to the vehicle chassis and carefully lower it to the floor. Remove the bolts securing the central support to the engine and gearbox and lower the complete assembly to the floor. Some variations have been found to not have sufficient clearance for the bolts to be removed due to the position of the exhaust downpipe. In these cases it may be necessary to lower the downpipe out of the way so that the bolts can be removed.

and the lower wishbone pivot support brackets. To avoid damaging the brake calliper pipe unbolt the supporting bracket (pictured below).

Disconnect the anti-roll bar link joint and lower the wishbone, taking care not to damage the ABS sensor wire. With care, pop the nearside drive shaft out of the gearbox and stow it to one side. On the offside driveshaft remove the driveshaft support bracket and the closing plates on the engine facing side of the gearbox. With care, extract the driveshaft out of the gearbox and stow it to one side. Undo the final bolt on the starter motor (pictured below) and with the aid of the transmission jack remove the remaining bell housing bolts. The gearbox can now be carefully lowered to the floor.

DMF best practice

Once the transmission has been removed check the Dual Mass Flywheel (DMF) for signs of heat stress (cracks and blueing) and evidence of excessive grease loss (deposits on the bell housing). The DMF should also be tested for rotational free-play and rock between the primary and secondary masses – LuK tool number 400 0080 10 is specifically designed for this purpose on all LuK manufactured DMFs. Full instructions and tolerance data for all LuK DMFs are contained on a CD which comes with this special tool.

Clean the first motion shaft splines and any debris from the bell housing (especially important when a release bearing has failed). Ensure that the release bearing is always replaced if the clutch and/or DMF are worn out. Put a small dab of high melting point grease (not a copper-based product) on the first motion shaft splines and make sure the new driven plate slides freely back and forth. This not only spreads the grease evenly but also makes sure you have the correct kit. Wipe any excess grease off the shaft and the driven plate hub. Using a universal alignment tool and checking the driven plate is the correct way round (note “Getriebe Seite” is German for “Gearbox Side”) the clutch can be bolted to the flywheel evenly and sequentially.

Before fitting the gearbox make sure the locating dowels are in place and not damaged. Refit any that have become dislodged and refit the gearbox. Make sure the gearbox bell housing bolts are secured before lowering the jack. Refitting is the reverse of the removal and make sure the manufacturer’s recommended torque settings are used.

How to change a clutch on a Nissan Qashqai

Famously named after a nomadic Turkic tribe in Iran and introduced in 2007, the first generation Nissan Qashqai has made quite an impact during its five-year production span.

Selling more than 130,000 vehicles until it was replaced by the second generation version in 2010, the Nissan has become a common sight in the UK aftermarket which makes it a prime candidate for a ‘clutch clinic’ inclusion.

Removing the clutch

No special tools are required to complete the repair, the only additional tools needed are a transmission jack, an engine support cradle and a long axle stand. A two-post ramp was used in this example and it is recommended that you don’t use a four-post ramp as it may not provide enough clearance. For the sake of safety it’s considered best practice to disconnect the battery earth lead before commencing work. If the vehicle has alloy wheels it may be fitted with anti-theft wheel bolts, so make sure you have the key before you start.

Open the bonnet and unbolt the clamp securing the battery. Undo the battery terminals and lift out the battery. Slide out the plastic battery undertray and release the electrical harnesses (Figs 1 & 2) attached to the battery support housing.

Fig 1

Fig 2

Undo the single bolt (pictured below) securing the airbox and release the clips securing it to the inlet manifold.

Unclip the housing near the grill and lift up the complete air filter housing. Undo the bolts securing the metal part of the battery tray and lift it out. Clamp the flexible part of the slave cylinder pipe to prevent any fluid loss and disconnect it. Unbolt both starter motor bolts and pull the unit back. Unclip the gear linkages by pulling the tab (Fig 4) and squeezing the clips together (Fig 5).

Fig 4

Fig 5

Remove all pipes and harnesses clipped to the gearbox and remove the upper bell housing bolts. Support the engine using the cradle and remove the complete gearbox mounting assembly. Raise the vehicle halfway and remove both front road wheels. Remove both hub nut split-pins and undo the nuts. Undo the bolt securing the lower suspension arm on both sides and release. Release both track rod ends and drain the gearbox oil. Remove the nearside driveshaft and the wheel arch liner (pictured below).

Disconnect the reverse light switch and remove the offside driveshaft by removing the support bracket bolts (pictured below).

Remove the gearbox stabiliser bracket and undo the lower bell housing bolts. Using the gearbox stand, carefully support the gearbox as its separated from the engine and rest it on the subframe under the wheel-arch. There should be enough clearance for the clutch and release bearing to be replaced without having to lower the subframe.

Checking the flywheel

With the clutch removed, check the flywheel for signs of heat stress. Clean the first motion shaft splines and any debris from the bell housing (especially important when a release bearing has failed). Depending on the application, the Concentric Slave Cylinder (CSC) may look a little different to the old version. This is completely normal as the original parts have been updated so don’t worry about fitting it. Selecting the correct CSC in some cases can get a little tricky as there are four different versions of the CSC fitted and they all have different sized connection ports. Don’t be alarmed if the motor factor asks you to measure the old CSC as this may be the only way to indentify the correct unit.

Put a small dab of high melting point grease (not a copper-based product) on the first motion shaft splines and make sure the new driven plate slides freely back and forth. This not only spreads the grease evenly but also makes sure you have the correct kit. Wipe any excess grease off the shaft and driven plate hub. Using a universal alignment tool, and checking the driven plate is the correct way round, (note “Getriebe Seite” is German for “Gearbox Side”) the clutch can be bolted to the flywheel evenly and sequentially.

Before fitting the gearbox make sure the locating dowels are in place and not damaged. Refit any that have become dislodged and refit the gearbox. Make sure the gearbox bell housing bolts are secured before lowering the jack. Refitting is the reverse of the removal.

How to change a clutch on a Vauxhall Vivaro

Launched in 2001, the Vauxhall Vivaro is an excellent example of mutual ventures between vehicle manufacturers; the Renault Traffic and Nissan Primastar are quite similar applications. With over 140,000 Vivaro’s on UK roads today, this handy clutch replacement guide from LuK should prove valuable.

It is possible to find two types of gearbox designs that changed around late-2006 and early-2007 on these applications. In this article, we tackled the later version of the Vivaro with the wiring loom positioned at the top of the gearbox, which hides the top bell housing bolts, so this will have to be removed. In this repair, we used a two-post ramp, two transmission jacks and a suspension arm lever. The first stage of the repair is to remove the top gear box mount nut with the vehicle still at ground level. The remainder of the repair can then proceed from underneath. Raise the vehicle and drain the gearbox oil. Remove the nearside front wheel. Inside the wheel arch, release two bolts holding in place the side shield (Fig 1).

How to change a clutch on a Vauxhall Vivaro

Fig 1

Support the gearbox using a transmission jack. Release the power steering pipe, which is positioned on the side of the gearbox, by removing two bolts from the retaining brackets. Remove the bolt holding the earth cable in position and stow safely (Fig 2).

How to change a clutch on a Vauxhall Vivaro

Fig 2

Release the second power steering pipe positioned at the front of the engine, held by two bolts mounted to the gearbox mount and one bolt at the rear of the engine. Remove three bolts that hold in place the gearbox mount: two on the side and one on the top. Then, release the top mount from its position. Disconnect the ABS sensor connectors and release three nuts connecting the lower suspension arm to the ball joint on the near side. Using the suspension arm lever, separate the parts (Fig 3), and swing the suspension leg to the side whilst holding and releasing the driveshaft from the gearbox.

How to change a clutch on a Vauxhall Vivaro

Fig 3

Repeat this procedure for the off-side, taking care when releasing the driveshaft from the gearbox, as it locates through a support bearing.

Bracket removal

The bracket will need to be removed releasing two bolts (Fig 4).

How to change a clutch on a Vauxhall Vivaro

Fig 4

Swing the suspension leg to the side, and the driveshaft and bearing will slide out of its location. We secured the driveshaft in place by using a pair of locking grips to stop it from returning to its original position through the support bracket (Fig 5).

How to change a clutch on a Vauxhall Vivaro

Fig 5

Remove the gear linkage and bracket as one complete assembly by removing three bolts – two situated on the side and one on the top of the gearbox – and stow. Disconnect the reverse light switch (Fig 6).

How to change a clutch on a Vauxhall Vivaro

Fig 6

Remove the plastic wiring loom carrier by removing two bolts – one at the front and one at the rear of the gearbox – then stow the wiring loom using cable ties (Fig 7).

How to change a clutch on a Vauxhall Vivaro

Fig 7

Remove the top two bell housing nuts and the two starter motor bolts, and then release the two bell housing bolts on the rear of the gearbox. Secure the front section power steering pipe using cable ties to ease the removal of the gearbox. We tried to lower the gearbox without doing this, and the pipe can get caught on the bell housing, so the pipe must be stowed to prevent any damage. Support the gearbox with a second transmission jack and cradle.

Lower gearbox to the floor

Remove the four bottom bell housing bolts and carefully lower the gearbox to the floor. Remove the worn clutch cover, drive plate and release bearing. With the clutch removed, check the flywheel for signs of heat stress. Clean the first motion shaft splines and any debris from the bell housing, which is especially important when a release bearing has failed.

Put a small dab of high-melting point grease – not a copper-based product – on the first motion shaft splines, and make sure the new driven plate slides freely back and forth. This not only spreads the grease evenly, but also makes sure you have the correct kit. Wipe any excess grease off the shaft and driven plate hub.

Using a universal alignment tool and checking the driven plate is the correct way round (note “Getriebe Seite” is German for “Gearbox Side”) the clutch can be bolted to the flywheel evenly and sequentially Before fitting the gearbox, make sure the locating dowels are in place and not damaged. Refit any that have become dislodged and refit the gearbox. Make sure the gearbox bell housing bolts are secured, and the gearbox mount is installed before removing the transmission jacks. Refitting of the parts is the reverse of removal.

Shock absorber replacement for the Nissan Qashqai

There are 167,000 Nissan Qashqai vehicles on the road in the UK, yet only around 100 per year are having their shock absorbers replaced. This could be because replacing the shock absorbers and coil springs on the front of a Nissan Qashqai (02.07-) requires a number of components to be removed under the bonnet to gain access.

KYB is one of the world’s largest manufacturers of OE shock absorbers, with almost 1 in 4 of all cars leaving production lines worldwide fitted with KYB as standard. The same world class product quality is available to the UK aftermarket, including front and rear shock absorbers for the Nissan Qashqai.

THE ICME RECOMMENDED FITTING TIME FOR THIS REPLACEMENT IS 1.7 HOURS PER SIDE.

1. Remove the tyre.

2. Undo the stabiliser link bar bracket bolt.

3. Release the ABS sensor cable from its clip.

4. Remove the clip from the bracket to release the brake hose cable.

5. Remove the pinch bolt to release the wheel hub.

6. Release the fuel piping to gain access to the top plate.

7. Remove the clip so you have better access to the top nut.

8. There is an additional nut to remove in the recess behind the top mount. Remove both wiper blades then remove the scuttle panel to ensure access to the last nut.

9. Your attention then turns to under the bonnet. Take out the wipers, lift off the rubber bonnet seal and the shock absorber housing and lift out the scuttle panel. Now you can remove the three screws of the upper mount (hold the SA with one hand so that it doesn’t fall). Don’t remove the top nut of the SA at the moment.

10. Remove the strut assembly and dismantle with a spring compressor.

11. Use an Allen key on the top of the strut to remove the top mount.

12. When you re-assemble the unit, the protection kit needs to be firmly located underneath the top mount to secure it.

13. Assemble the new KYB shock absorber, coil spring, protection kit and top mount in the compressor with the gate closed. Ensure that you never use mole grips to steady the piston rod whilst assembling the unit – the grip can damage the smooth chrome coating on the piston rod which will result in it not having perfect contact with the oil seal, causing premature leaking.

14. If the spring, when removed, was seated on a cushion then this should be replaced. Twist the spring so it lines up correctly in the spring seat.

15. The assembled suspension unit can now be offered up under the wheel arch and fixed in position from the top first. All of the other components should then be reattached in reverse order and tightened to the correct torque.

DON’T FORGET TO WEAR PROTECTION!
A shock absorber replacement isn’t complete without a new protection kit. These kits are a critical element for shock absorber performance, offering a host of benefits that includes:

  • Protecting the piston rod from damage and rust
  • Protecting the sealing joint to avoid oil leakages
  • Reducing the risks of damaging other suspension components
  • Shows your customer (the motorist) that the job has been done properly