Category Archives: Honda

Installation Recommendations for Honda Timing Belt System – A Technical Tip from Gates

Below is the result from improper belt setup. Notice the damaged spring, this is the result of turning the crankshaft clockwise during initial setup, which is incorrect.

See installation instructions provided in this kit. Crankshaft must be rotated two turns COUNTERCLOCKWISE with locking pin in tensioner and attachment bolt loose.

screen-shot-2016-11-02-at-16-38-49

Not following proper installation procedures will cause:

  • Incorrect tensioner position
  • Improper belt tension

Resulting in:

  • A violent correction of the tensioner position
  • Damage to tensioner and/or spring and/or belt
  • Improper belt tracking causing interference with other components
  • Catastrophic engine damage due to timing belt and other component failure

During setup attention needs to be given to the relationship of tensioner spring. The spring must be in the “UP” position which is noted on the spring rubber dampener.

2001 – 2003 model years may require a longer fastening bolt!

Please be advised that early model year Civics may require an updated tensioner bolt. Honda upgraded the timing belt tensioner assembly in late 2002. Gates T43175 follows the design change. During this change the OE bolt length was also changed to allow for proper thread engagement. Gates supplies the updated bolt as part of TCK312 / TCKWP312 Kits.

Verify this issue with one of the following procedures, the updated OE tensioner and bolt has been provided in this kit.

  1. With tensioner fastening bolt placed through tensioner assembly – Verify there is 15mm of thread engagement.
  2. Measure Bolt: Bolt length for new tensioner design provided in this kit should be 54mm in length. (Incorrect Bolt Length Is 50.6mm)

Proper installation is critical. Improper installation will void warranty and will most likely result in major engine damage! 

Crankshafts on these engines rotate counterclockwise! 

What is DSG clutch technology?

Since 2008, many new VAG models have been equipped with the new seven-speed dual clutch gearbox (DSG) with an LuK dry double clutch (2CT) system, or – since 2004 – a six-speed wet clutch version which also features an LuK dual mass flywheel (DMF). You will find the six-speed version mostly fitted to larger, high powered vehicles, such as the Passat CC, whilst the seven-speed is being fitted to the ever more popular range of smaller vehicles throughout the range, such as the Polo and Golf.

Best of both worlds
These high-tech state-of-the-art transmissions are designed to incorporate the best advantages of both automatic and manual gearboxes. Automatic transmissions are able to offer superb driving comfort thanks to an automated gear shift and uninterrupted traction, whilst manual transmissions are sporty, fun and economical. A twin clutch system therefore combines the comfort of an automatic with the agility of a manual, along with incredibly smooth and fast gearshifts.

Technically, a DSG is an automated shift gearbox featuring two gear sets which operate independently of each other, thereby enabling fully automatic gear change without traction interruption. There is no clutch pedal and the conventional gear lever has been replaced with a lever with integrated Tiptronic function.

The image below shows a cutaway shot of an LuK Dry Double Clutch

As gear changes are fully computer controlled, it is much more difficult for poor or aggressive drivers to cause damage or premature wear to the system, which should help to optimise the expected service life of the clutch and gearbox components. Like conventional singledisc clutches, the dry double clutch of the seven-speed DSG is also located in the gearbox housing.

There are no drag losses as it is not oilimmersed, increasing engine and fuel efficiency whilst also making repairs less complex. From a technician’s point of view, the gearbox and clutch electronics (mechatronics) are diagnosable, so the system can be read using suitable diagnostic equipment. A full system reset – which puts the mechatronics unit into ‘Learn Mode’ – is required after every clutch replacement, again a simple function as long as you are using the correct equipment.

Since the clutch fitted to the Volkswagen six-speed DSG is oil-immersed (known as a wet clutch) it tends to wear at a much slower rate than equivalent dry clutches. However, there is the possibility that the DMF could wear and require replacement, especially as this transmission has been fitted to Volkswagen Group vehicles for more than 10 years. Fortunately, in a twin clutch transmission – and for the Volkswagen Group DSG in particular – this can be a much simpler task than for a conventional system, as the clutch is not bolted directly to the DMF.

No special tooling or training should be required for experienced clutch mechanics to be able to manage a twin clutch DMF replacement, and as the original equipment manufacturer of the dual mass flywheel for the six-speed Volkswagen DSG, LuK is on hand to supply the replacement DMF unit to the aftermarket as required.

The LuK Dry Double Clutch in-situ

The LuK designed and manufactured seven-speed dry clutch system also features a DMF that is not directly bolted to the flywheel and is just as simple to replace when worn. LuK engineers have also been investigating the potential for a complete replacement twin clutch kit solution for the UK aftermarket.

A range of original equipment components, specific tools and bespoke training programmes have already been designed and developed, and LuK is currently assessing the size of the opportunity for independents to offer the owners of vehicles coming out of the warranty period a viable aftermarket option when it comes to buying a replacement twin-clutch.

Due to its success with the DSG, the Volkswagen Group has already announced that more than 40% of the cars they produce will be fitted with a dual clutch system by 2012, and this has not gone unnoticed in the automotive world. With the improved fuel economy and lowered emission levels it can help provide, many other vehicle manufacturers are now beginning to specify twin clutch transmission systems to help keep in line with ever more stringent Government legislation.

Vehicle producers that are currently using twin clutch systems, or who are developing new versions to use in their range include: Audi, Ford, Honda, Hyundai, Mercedes-Benz, Renault, Seat and Skoda. LuK, as ever, will be at the forefront of this rapidly growing market, thanks to its ongoing commitment to innovation, technology and quality.

The benefits of a dual clutch system

• Combines the ease of an automatic transmission with the responsiveness of a manual gearbox
• Similar to an automatic transmission, but with excellent fuel efficiency
• No power interruption during torque transfer
• Significant reduction in CO2 emissions

Clutch Replacement – Honda Civic 1.6 Petrol

It’s hard to believe that the first Honda Civic was introduced way back in 1972 – amazingly that’s almost 40 years in production! The Civic has proved a popular purchase in the UK after gaining a reputation for reliability and quality. In this technical article we’re going to take a look at the seventh generation Civic (2000-05) which in the UK has sold a massive 139,000 models and, as a result, is now a popular sight in the aftermarket scene.

A clutch replacement on the Civic can be a little tricky but with the guidance of LuK the whole process will become much easier. Nothing out of the ordinary is needed to complete the job, the only special tools required are a transmission jack, an engine support cradle and a long axle stand. A twopost ramp was used in this example, however a four-post ramp may not provide enough clearance.

For safety reasons its considered best practice to disconnect the battery earth lead before commencing work. If the vehicle has alloy wheels it may be fitted with anti-theft wheel bolts, so make sure you have the key before you start.

Open the bonnet and remove the battery terminals by releasing the clamps. Undo and remove the battery securing bracket and lift out the battery. Release the battery harness from the metal battery tray and unclip it from around the air intake pipe. Remove the air plenum chamber and the flex pipe, making sure you have removed the attached hidden clip (pictured below).

Remove the springs retaining the gear shifting cables. Then remove the clips (pictured below), securing them to the support brackets. Pull out the selector cables and stow them to one side.

Looking at the large lifting eye bracket on top of the gearbox, release the attached wiring harness (pictured below) and disconnect the reverse light switch connector. Remove the earth point, undo the slave cylinder support bracket and stow them to one side.

Disconnect the starter motor and its attached harness and undo the upper bell housing bolts securing the gearbox.

Disconnect the speedometer (pictured below) connection at the rear of the gearbox. Fit the engine support cradle then undo and release the gearbox and engine mounts accessible from above.

Raise the vehicle and remove the O/S front wheel. Drain the gearbox oil and undo and release the lower O/S arm. Undo the O/S hub nut and release the driveshaft from the hub and move the strut to one side. Pull out the O/S driveshaft and remove the remaining bolts from the front and rear gearbox/engine mounts (pictured below). Finally remove the lower bell-housing bolts and, with the transmission jack, support and withdraw the gearbox.

At this point the gearbox can be moved across and rested on the subframe, a suitable gap is produced which is enough to access all of the clutch components. If more access is required or the gearbox needs to be removed altogether then the subframe and N/S driveshaft will have to be removed.

With the clutch removed, check the flywheel or Dual Mass Flywheel (if it has one fitted) for signs of heat stress and evidence of grease loss. The DMF should also be tested for free play and rock between the primary and secondary masses (LuK tool number 400 0080 10 is specifically designed for this purpose on all LuK manufactured DMFs). Full instructions and tolerance data for all LuK DMFs are contained on a CD which comes with this special tool. Some vehicles (like this one) may have a release fork that operates on a ball pivot (pictured below), these components need to be checked for wear and tear and will almost certainly need to be replaced if they are found to be excessively worn.

Clean the first motion shaft splines and any debris from the bell housing (especially important when a release bearing has failed). Put a small dab of high melting point grease (not a copper-based product) on the first motion shaft splines and make sure the new driven plate slides freely back and forth. This not only spreads the grease evenly but also makes sure you have the correct kit. Wipe excess grease off the shaft and driven plate hub. Using a universal alignment tool and checking the driven plate is the correct way round (note “Getriebe Seite” is German for “Gearbox Side”) the clutch can be bolted to the flywheel evenly and sequentially.

Before fitting the gearbox make sure the locating dowels are in place and not damaged. Refit any that have become dislodged and refit the gearbox. Make sure the gearbox bell housing bolts are secured before lowering the jack. Refitting is the reverse of the removal.

How to replace a timing belt on a Mazda 6

Launched in 2002, the timing belt system on the Mazda 6 may look ominous, but with a little know-how and the appropriate tools, it will prove to be an ideal repair for any UK garage.

Engine type

The engine has been identified as an interference type so, in the event of a cambelt failure, the likelihood of engine damage is extremely high. It is important to install a new timing belt system on an engine at ambient room temperature.

Always adhere to turning the engine in the normal direction of rotation, unless advised otherwise by the OEM installation instructions. Recommended torque values should always be used, and it is recommended that all the tensioners and pulleys are replaced at the same time as the cambelt.

A two-post ramp is ideal for the work to be carried out. If the vehicle has alloy wheels fitted, then the chances are they will have antilocking theft bolts installed, so make sure that you have the key available to remove them.

Removal

Open the bonnet and, for safety measures, disconnect the battery earth terminal. Remove the engine top cover, which is held with three 10mm nuts. Remove the RH front wheel and remove eight fixings from the front of the wheel arch liner and underneath the bumper. It is advised to remove the liner completely, but we found this not necessary as the liner can just be supported away from the work area (Fig 1 below).

Fig 1

Remove the engine under shield and support the engine with a trolley jack. Remove the RH engine mount, which is held with two nuts and one bolt (Fig 2 below).

Fig 2

Remove the upper timing belt cover; this is held by seven bolts. Release the auxiliary belt tensioner and remove the auxiliary belt. Remove the crankshaft pulley cover by unclipping it from its position and unbolt the six bolts that hold the crankshaft pulley in place.

Rotate the crankshaft clockwise and align the three timing marks on the camshaft, high-pressure fuel pump and crankshaft pulley (Fig 3 below).

Fig 3

After alignment, install an 8mm bolt into the camshaft pulley, taking care not to overtighten the bolt as damage can be caused to the pulley (Fig 4 below).

Fig 4

Unbolt the automatic tensioner retaining bolts and remove the tensioner unit from its position. Remove the tensioner pulley and bracket; this is a little tricky to get to so we used a normal allen key from underneath to remove the retaining bolt (Fig 5 below). Remove the guide pulley and, finally, the timing belt.

Fig 5

Installation

Install the new tensioner pulley and idler pulley, taking care to leave the green seal facing towards the wheel of the idler as this is an offset pulley and could cause the belt to misalign inside the drive system.

Verify the timing marks are correctly aligned. It is advised to use an alignment tool on the high pressure fuel pump, but in this example we could not see the benefit of using the tool. The timing marks were correct on the fuel pump pulley, so we then installed the timing belt in an anti-clockwise direction, starting from the crankshaft pulley.

Remove the 8mm bolt from the camshaft pulley and install the new automatic tensioner and two retaining bolts. Using a torque wrench, tighten to a correct torque of 25Nm (Fig 6 below).

Fig 6

Remove the retaining pin from the tensioner body to release the pushrod (Fig 7 below) and rotate the crankshaft two turns clockwise. Check the timing marks are aligned on the camshaft, high-pressure fuel pump and crankshaft.

Fig 7

If they are not then the tensioning process will need to be repeated, taking extra care to compress the push-rod into the tensioner body vertically and holding in place with the retaining pin.

The installation of the remaining parts is the reverse order of removal. It is strongly advised to check the condition of the auxiliary belt and driven components for excessive wear and consider replacing them.

Finally, it is advisable to rotate the engine by hand a number of times before starting the engine, to check for any interference or noise.

How to change a clutch on a Honda CR-V

The Honda CR-V was launched in 1995 and is a popular multi-purpose vehicle. Now onto its fourth generation, this handy guide should prove to be a worthwhile read for any garage in the UK aftermarket faced with clutch replacement on the third generation 2.2 CDTi model.

No special tools are required to complete the repair, but you need to support the engine, gearbox and subframe. We used four transmission jacks, but you could use two jacks and some rope to support the subframe. A two-post ramp was used for the replacement.

Open the bonnet and, for safety reasons, disconnect the battery terminals. Remove the battery and the housing tray. Slacken and remove the air filter case fixing that is attached to the battery support bracket, and remove the air flow pipe that is in two sections. The air filter case is removed by carefully levering the rear of the case from the two push fit connector bracket; the bracket will also need to be removed (Fig 1 below).

Fig 1

Remove the battery support bracket and stow the terminals safely to the side. The reverse light connector is now exposed and can be disconnected and stowed safely. Remove the gear selector linkages by slackening three bolts from the bracket. It is less fiddly than unclipping them individually from the bracket and can be stowed safely as one complete unit (Fig 2 below).

Fig 2

Three further multi-plug connectors to be disconnected are located on the gearbox. Remove two bolts from the slave cylinder bracket (Fig 3 below).

Fig 3

Remove one nut that holds the hydraulic pipe (Fig 4 below) and stow safely as one unit. Remove the bracket with the earth cable still attached and stow safely.

Fig 4

Remove both wheels

Remove the two nuts and one bolt that hold the top engine mount in place. The mount does not need to be removed. Slacken the two bolts from the gearbox mount and remove. Before raising the vehicle, remove two bell housing bolts from the top of the gearbox. The bolt closest to the bumper is in a slightly tricky position and holds in place a wiring harness (Fig 5 below).

Fig 5

Remove both front wheels and raise the vehicle. Remove the push-in retainer clips holding the under shield flaps inside the wheel arch – there are two clips on each side. Remove all retaining push-in clips holding the under shield in place – there are quite a few and you will find two that are hidden, one on each side towards the front that also need to be removed (Fig 6 below).

Fig 6

Pull away the complete under shield, taking extra care of the flaps from inside the wheel arch, as it is all one piece. Support the engine and gearbox with transmission jacks and drain the gearbox oil.

Remove two nuts and one bolt on each side, securing the lower suspension arm to the ball joint and unlink. Remove the rubber bracket from the exhaust closest to the catalytic convertor. Unlink the front-end prop shaft by slackening the four double hex bolts. Remove the bolt that secures the power steering pipe bracket to the subframe (Fig 7 below) and unclip the pipe from the two clips holding it in place.

Fig 7

Free the driveshaft on the left-hand side and remove. Slacken the eight subframe bolts (four on each side) to allow the subframe to lower slightly without removing it fully. Remove the bolt that secures the engine stabiliser and lower the subframe from the rear.

Intercooler pipe removal

Remove the intercooler pipe – this blocks two bell housing bolts – and then remove the eight bolts from the bell housing. One of the bolts is in an awkward position so we used a spanner to remove this (Fig 8 below).

Fig 8

Another bolt is secured through the starter motor. With the clutch removed, check the dual mass flywheel (DMF) for signs of heat stress and evidence of grease loss.

The DMF should also be tested for free play and rock between the primary and secondary masses. LuK tool number 400 0080 10 is specifically designed for this purpose on all LuK manufactured DMFs. Full instructions and tolerance data for all LuK DMFs are contained on a CD that comes with this special tool.

Clean the first motion shaft splines and any debris from the bell housing, which is especially important when a release bearing has failed. Put a small dab of high melting point grease – not a copper-based product – on the first motion shaft splines, and make sure the new driven plate slides freely back and forth.

This not only spreads the grease evenly, but also makes sure you have the correct kit. Wipe any excess grease off the shaft and driven plate hub. Using a universal alignment tool, and checking the driven plate is the correct way round (note “Getriebe Seite” is German for “Gearbox Side”), the clutch can be bolted to the flywheel evenly and sequentially.

Before fitting the gearbox, make sure the locating dowels are in place and not damaged. Refit any that have become dislodged and refit the gearbox. Make sure the gearbox bell housing bolts are secured before lowering the jack. Refitting is the reverse of the removal.

How to fit a clutch on a Honda Jazz II

RECOMMENDED LABOUR TIME: 4.5 HOURS LUK PART NUMBER: 619308900

“Despite excellent reliability the Jazz II can present wear, so the chance of it arriving at an independent garage is highly likely.”

Now into its third generation, the Honda Jazz has been around since 1982. With various engine alternatives (including a hybrid option) this small city car is proving to be quite popular on UK roads. Despite excellent reliability it can present wear, especially due to the miles driven around the city, so the chance of this vehicle arriving at a UK independent garage is highly likely.

For this repair we used a two-post ramp, two long axle stands, an engine support and a transmission jack with cradle. You’ll also require a driven plate alignment tool. Before starting the repair, if the vehicle is installed with alloy wheels then ensure the wheel nut locking tool is available. Disconnect the battery cables and stow them carefully before removing the battery and battery tray.

Remove the air filter box

Disconnect the air sensor cable on the air filter box and remove the air filter box as a complete unit to expose the top of the gearbox. Carefully remove the two bolts that hold the slave cylinder in place and remove the bolt that holds the hydraulic clutch line. Take care not to tear the protective push rod boot.

How to fit a clutch on a Honda Jazz II

The slave cylinder and pipe doesn’t require complete removal and can be stowed carefully, making sure the pipe is not bent in any way.

How to fit a clutch on a Honda Jazz II

Disconnect the reverse light switch and unclip the two clips securing the cable and stow carefully. The gear linkage cables can now be removed. Remove the clip that secures the cables in the bracket and remove the clips that hold the cables onto the linkage arm on top of the gearbox. Pop off the cables and stow carefully without bending them. Disconnect the speed sensor and oxygen sensor and stow. Install the engine support. Remove the upper transmission mount bolt and finally remove the top transmission mount bracket.

The vehicle can now be raised and the engine under-tray can be removed. Drain the transmission oil. The next stage is to remove the drive shafts; this means disconnecting the ball joints and stabiliser links on both sides. Remove the drive shaft nut then, by suitable means, push the drive shafts inside. Using a 5mm Allen key and 14mm ring spanner release the ball joint pin and separate the stabiliser links from the stabiliser.

How to fit a clutch on a Honda Jazz II

Remove the spring clips and castle nut and separate the lower arms from the knuckle. Then remove the cotter pin and nuts and separate the ball joints. Once this has been done remove the three bolts and heat cover and remove both drive shafts, taking care not to damage any seals from the gearbox.

How to fit a clutch on a Honda Jazz II

The sub frame will need to be removed next. The steering rack is attached to the sub frame but the rack can stay attached to the vehicle as you have no reason to remove completely. Remove the two sub frame stay bolts. Detach the rack from the sub frame and gearbox by removing the bolts and brackets. Finally, remove the three rear transmission mount bracket bolts.

Support the sub frame using the long axle stands and remove the sub frame mounting bolts, before carefully lowering the sub frame. Support the gearbox using the transmission jack and remove the rear transmission mount and bracket. Remove the protection cover from the gearbox and then remove the front transmission mount.

How to fit a clutch on a Honda Jazz II

The starter can remain in position for this vehicle. Remove the bell housing bolts and air cleaner bracket and carefully separate the gearbox from the engine and lower to the floor.

How to fit a clutch on a Honda Jazz II

Remove the worn clutch, bearing and fork.

Check the flywheel for signs of heat stress or excessive wear. If the surface of the flywheel is to be skimmed, make sure that the same amount is taken from the clutch bolting surface. Failure to check and rectify these areas may cause the clutch to operate incorrectly. Clean the bell housing and remove any debris. If any oil leaks are visible then these must be repaired before refitting the gearbox.

Before fitting the new clutch disc, make sure the input shaft is clean and free from any wear. Put a small dab of high melting point grease (not a copper-based product) on the first motion shaft splines and make sure the new driven plate slides freely back and forth. This not only spreads the grease evenly but also makes sure you have the correct kit. Wipe away any excess grease off the shaft and driven plate hub. Using a universal alignment tool and checking the driven plate is the correct way round (note “Getriebe Seite” is German for “Gearbox Side”), the clutch can be bolted to the flywheel evenly and sequentially.

Make sure any dowels have not become dislodged or damaged and replace any that have. Install the gearbox and make sure the bolts are secured and all mountings are refitted before removing the supporting transmission jacks.

Refitting the remaining components is the reverse of removal.

 

MEET THEM AT MECHANEX

Schaeffler Automotive Aftermarket’s three quality brands – LuK, INA and FAG – will all be in attendance throughout 2015 at our MECHANEX trade shows.

Offering visitors the opportunity to talk to Schaeffler’s group of experienced experts who will be on hand to offer helpful demonstrations and workshop hints, attendees can also find out about the latest technologies that will soon be appearing in their workshop.

How to fit a clutch on a Honda Jazz II

RECOMMENDED LABOUR TIME: 4.5 HOURS LUK PART NUMBER: 619308900

“Despite excellent reliability the Jazz II can present wear, so the chance of it arriving at an independent garage is highly likely.”

Now into its third generation, the Honda Jazz has been around since 1982. With various engine alternatives (including a hybrid option) this small city car is proving to be quite popular on UK roads. Despite excellent reliability it can present wear, especially due to the miles driven around the city, so the chance of this vehicle arriving at a UK independent garage is highly likely.

For this repair we used a two-post ramp, two long axle stands, an engine support and a transmission jack with cradle. You’ll also require a driven plate alignment tool. Before starting the repair, if the vehicle is installed with alloy wheels then ensure the wheel nut locking tool is available. Disconnect the battery cables and stow them carefully before removing the battery and battery tray.

Remove the air filter box

Disconnect the air sensor cable on the air filter box and remove the air filter box as a complete unit to expose the top of the gearbox. Carefully remove the two bolts that hold the slave cylinder in place and remove the bolt that holds the hydraulic clutch line. Take care not to tear the protective push rod boot.

How to fit a clutch on a Honda Jazz II

The slave cylinder and pipe doesn’t require complete removal and can be stowed carefully, making sure the pipe is not bent in any way.

How to fit a clutch on a Honda Jazz II

Disconnect the reverse light switch and unclip the two clips securing the cable and stow carefully. The gear linkage cables can now be removed. Remove the clip that secures the cables in the bracket and remove the clips that hold the cables onto the linkage arm on top of the gearbox. Pop off the cables and stow carefully without bending them. Disconnect the speed sensor and oxygen sensor and stow. Install the engine support. Remove the upper transmission mount bolt and finally remove the top transmission mount bracket.

The vehicle can now be raised and the engine under-tray can be removed. Drain the transmission oil. The next stage is to remove the drive shafts; this means disconnecting the ball joints and stabiliser links on both sides. Remove the drive shaft nut then, by suitable means, push the drive shafts inside. Using a 5mm Allen key and 14mm ring spanner release the ball joint pin and separate the stabiliser links from the stabiliser.

How to fit a clutch on a Honda Jazz II

Remove the spring clips and castle nut and separate the lower arms from the knuckle. Then remove the cotter pin and nuts and separate the ball joints. Once this has been done remove the three bolts and heat cover and remove both drive shafts, taking care not to damage any seals from the gearbox.

How to fit a clutch on a Honda Jazz II

The sub frame will need to be removed next. The steering rack is attached to the sub frame but the rack can stay attached to the vehicle as you have no reason to remove completely. Remove the two sub frame stay bolts. Detach the rack from the sub frame and gearbox by removing the bolts and brackets. Finally, remove the three rear transmission mount bracket bolts.

Support the sub frame using the long axle stands and remove the sub frame mounting bolts, before carefully lowering the sub frame. Support the gearbox using the transmission jack and remove the rear transmission mount and bracket. Remove the protection cover from the gearbox and then remove the front transmission mount.

How to fit a clutch on a Honda Jazz II

The starter can remain in position for this vehicle. Remove the bell housing bolts and air cleaner bracket and carefully separate the gearbox from the engine and lower to the floor.

How to fit a clutch on a Honda Jazz II

Remove the worn clutch, bearing and fork.

Check the flywheel for signs of heat stress or excessive wear. If the surface of the flywheel is to be skimmed, make sure that the same amount is taken from the clutch bolting surface. Failure to check and rectify these areas may cause the clutch to operate incorrectly. Clean the bell housing and remove any debris. If any oil leaks are visible then these must be repaired before refitting the gearbox.

Before fitting the new clutch disc, make sure the input shaft is clean and free from any wear. Put a small dab of high melting point grease (not a copper-based product) on the first motion shaft splines and make sure the new driven plate slides freely back and forth. This not only spreads the grease evenly but also makes sure you have the correct kit. Wipe away any excess grease off the shaft and driven plate hub. Using a universal alignment tool and checking the driven plate is the correct way round (note “Getriebe Seite” is German for “Gearbox Side”), the clutch can be bolted to the flywheel evenly and sequentially.

Make sure any dowels have not become dislodged or damaged and replace any that have. Install the gearbox and make sure the bolts are secured and all mountings are refitted before removing the supporting transmission jacks.

Refitting the remaining components is the reverse of removal.

For the latest in online support log on to www.repxpert.com.

MEET THEM AT MECHANEX

Schaeffler Automotive Aftermarket’s three quality brands – LuK, INA and FAG – will all be in attendance throughout 2015 at our MECHANEX trade shows.

Offering visitors the opportunity to talk to Schaeffler’s group of experienced experts who will be on hand to offer helpful demonstrations and workshop hints, attendees can also find out about the latest technologies that will soon be appearing in their workshop.