Category Archives: Ford

How to Fit a Clutch on a Ford Transit

A full clutch replacement guide for a 2.4 TDCI 2006 Ford Transit from the experts at Schaeffler Automotive Aftermarket.

Ford released its first-generation Transit to the UK market in 1965 and the vehicle has received numerous facelifts along the way to becoming today’s current fourth generation model.

More than eight million Transits have been sold, making it the third best-selling van of all time. It has also been the best-selling light commercial vehicle in Europe for the last 40 years, so with this in mind, there is great opportunity to service and repair these vehicles.

In this month’s article, we are replacing a clutch on a 2006 Ford Transit 2.4 TDCI, which has covered more than 150,000 miles, where the customer has reported clutch slip under load. For this repair, we used the following workshop equipment: a four-post ramp with a beam jack, transmission jack and a tall axle stand.

Battery disconnection is required for this repair and it is advised to obtain the radio security code from the customer before starting. A short road test confirmed a diagnosis of clutch slip under load, and with over 150,000 miles on the clock, a clutch replacement was recommended. The workshop repair instructions and times were obtained from the Schaeffler REPXPERT online workshop portal.

With the vehicle positioned on the ramp, slide the driver’s seat forward to access the battery and disconnect the negative battery lead (see below), then raise the ramp and disconnect the propshaft from the gearbox by removing the three bolts and unbolt the two support bearings. The propshaft can then be positioned on the ramp with the rear still connected to the differential.

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Now remove the gearbox sub frame. Start by supporting the vehicle weight under the front cross member (see below), remove the pinch bolt from the steering column/rack connection and disconnect the steering column and secure to prevent rotation.

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After that, remove the oil feed and return pipes from the steering rack body (see below) and cap to prevent the oil system draining.

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Support the sub frame with a transmission jack and the gearbox with a tall axle stand. Remove the two large bolts that fix the rear gearbox mounting to the sub frame, and then remove the two bolts that go through the sub frame and bottom arm, as well as the rear mounts, and then remove the two nuts that hold the front of the sub frame to the chassis legs. Ease the sub frame down until it releases from the front locating studs. Once free, it can then be pushed forward and secured if required. We used a large strap to retain the forward position, ensuring good access to the gearbox.

Disconnect the two gear change cables by releasing from the ball joints and slide the outer cable sideways out of the mounting bracket. Disconnect the reverse light switch multiplug, clamp the flexible hydraulic clutch pipe and then release it from the slave cylinder connection (see below).

clutch-clinic-ford-transit-4

Remove the starter motor fixing bolts and earth strap and ease the starter motor away from the gearbox. It can then remain in this position. Support the gearbox with the transmission jack and place a thin support block inbetween the engine sump and cross member. Now disconnect the engine speed sensor at the top of the bell housing and remove the bell housing bolts. The gearbox can now be eased back from the engine and removed from the vehicle.

With the gearbox removed, a visual inspection of the clutch was carried out and wear was evident as the small adjuster ring springs were fully extended (see below) and contact marks were visible on the cover limit stop.

clutch-clinic-ford-transit-5

Remove the clutch assembly. At this point, the Dual Mass Flywheel (DMF) can be checked for wear using the LuK DMF Checkpoint App (see below) and a special DMF tool (400 0080 10), but as we were replacing the DMF on the customer’s request, the check was not required and no wear was evident.

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Check the rear main oil seal for any wear or leaks, and inspect the spigot bearing for excess play or wear and lightly lubricate. It is good practice to clean/de-grease the rear of the engine and the gearbox bell housing. Remove the release bearing, check for any wear on the input shaft sleeve, pivot points and release arm. Lightly smear the input shaft splines with high melting point grease and mount the new clutch plate on the splines to confirm correct fitment. Remove the clutch plate as well as any excess grease and fit the new release bearing in the correct location.

This is a good point to flush out the old contaminated clutch fluid by placing a drainer under the clutch pipe and flushing the system through. Fit the new flywheel. This will only fit in one position as it has a location dowel. Replace the flywheel bolts as per the REPXPERT repair instructions and follow the torque sequence, then mount the new Self-Adjusting Clutch assembly using the LuK universal mounting tool (400 0237 10) (see below).

clutch-clinic-ford-transit-7

Check that the clutch plate is positioned correctly with the wording ‘Getriebeseite’ or ‘Gearbox Side’ facing the gearbox, and check the torque aligns with the manufacturer’s specification.

Check the bell housing dowels are installed in the engine, install the gearbox and refit components in reverse order of removal and bleed the clutch. When bleeding the clutch hydraulic system, connect a bleed bottle to the bleed nipple via a hose and open the bleed nipple. This system is gravity bled, and ensures the clutch master cylinder does not run dry. Once the battery has been connected, enter the radio security code and set the clock, road test the vehicle and confirm a successful repair.

Proper Ford Fan Clutch Installation – A Technical Tip from Gates

Upon installation of the fan clutch assembly, be certain to completely secure the clutch nut until flush with the water pump flange. Failure to secure and properly torque the fan and clutch assembly to the water pump, may lead to premature water pump failure and or an unsafe operating condition.

The Gates Technical Team has found through extensive field analysis, the fan clutch assembly is not being secured into position correctly at the time of installation, but allowing the direction of engine rotation to tighten the fan assembly in some cases. This process does not provide appropriate attachment torque for operation, as the rotating mass of the fan may loosen the clutch nut upon shut-down.

Note: OE Recommended Torque Specification Is: (98 Ft. Lbs. or 133 N.m). The clutch nut is manufactured with right handed threads and will need to be rotated counterclockwise for removal.

A loose fan clutch assembly will create an imbalance within the fan to water pump. This imbalance creates excessive force upon the water pump shaft and bearing which can lead to a bearing walk out condition. This premature failure due to improper installation may affect other nearby components resulting in excessive repair costs.

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When servicing a cooling system it is recommended that a complete system flush be performed. Always ensure the cooling system is filled with OE specified type coolant and never mix coolant types.

Ford Transit Rear Drums & Judder – Apec Bulletin

We would like to bring to your notice the importance of fitting and securing Ford Transit drums correctly. Failure to follow the correct procedure can result in drums being distorted and inevitably cause judder.

  • Follow normal drum fitting procedures (cleanliness of drum to hub etc)
  • Offer wheel to studs and loosely tighten wheel nuts. Do not over tighten.
  • Now gradually tighten each nut in diagonal sequence as shown below and finally to the correct torque settings.

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Air filter fitting tips

Air filter element installation on some Ford Focus/C-Max/Kuga, Mazda 3 and Volvo C30, C70, S40 & V50 models is simple, provided certain fitment points are observed.

The MANN-FILTER air filter for this application is the OE design. However, you can ensure optimum sealing and installation by following this fitment guide.

First, lightly lubricate the seal.

1. Before inserting the filter element, lightly lubricate the seal. Then ensure that the alignment post on the filter end cap is correctly located in the ‘notch’ on the filter housing.

2. Ensure that the edge of the filter element end cap completely fits into the groove of the housing.

3. Pull the end of the housing away from the element and, at the same time, push the filter element in the opposite direction.

4. Once located, the filter element end cap has to be positioned behind the filter housing lip.

What is DSG clutch technology?

Since 2008, many new VAG models have been equipped with the new seven-speed dual clutch gearbox (DSG) with an LuK dry double clutch (2CT) system, or – since 2004 – a six-speed wet clutch version which also features an LuK dual mass flywheel (DMF). You will find the six-speed version mostly fitted to larger, high powered vehicles, such as the Passat CC, whilst the seven-speed is being fitted to the ever more popular range of smaller vehicles throughout the range, such as the Polo and Golf.

Best of both worlds
These high-tech state-of-the-art transmissions are designed to incorporate the best advantages of both automatic and manual gearboxes. Automatic transmissions are able to offer superb driving comfort thanks to an automated gear shift and uninterrupted traction, whilst manual transmissions are sporty, fun and economical. A twin clutch system therefore combines the comfort of an automatic with the agility of a manual, along with incredibly smooth and fast gearshifts.

Technically, a DSG is an automated shift gearbox featuring two gear sets which operate independently of each other, thereby enabling fully automatic gear change without traction interruption. There is no clutch pedal and the conventional gear lever has been replaced with a lever with integrated Tiptronic function.

The image below shows a cutaway shot of an LuK Dry Double Clutch

As gear changes are fully computer controlled, it is much more difficult for poor or aggressive drivers to cause damage or premature wear to the system, which should help to optimise the expected service life of the clutch and gearbox components. Like conventional singledisc clutches, the dry double clutch of the seven-speed DSG is also located in the gearbox housing.

There are no drag losses as it is not oilimmersed, increasing engine and fuel efficiency whilst also making repairs less complex. From a technician’s point of view, the gearbox and clutch electronics (mechatronics) are diagnosable, so the system can be read using suitable diagnostic equipment. A full system reset – which puts the mechatronics unit into ‘Learn Mode’ – is required after every clutch replacement, again a simple function as long as you are using the correct equipment.

Since the clutch fitted to the Volkswagen six-speed DSG is oil-immersed (known as a wet clutch) it tends to wear at a much slower rate than equivalent dry clutches. However, there is the possibility that the DMF could wear and require replacement, especially as this transmission has been fitted to Volkswagen Group vehicles for more than 10 years. Fortunately, in a twin clutch transmission – and for the Volkswagen Group DSG in particular – this can be a much simpler task than for a conventional system, as the clutch is not bolted directly to the DMF.

No special tooling or training should be required for experienced clutch mechanics to be able to manage a twin clutch DMF replacement, and as the original equipment manufacturer of the dual mass flywheel for the six-speed Volkswagen DSG, LuK is on hand to supply the replacement DMF unit to the aftermarket as required.

The LuK Dry Double Clutch in-situ

The LuK designed and manufactured seven-speed dry clutch system also features a DMF that is not directly bolted to the flywheel and is just as simple to replace when worn. LuK engineers have also been investigating the potential for a complete replacement twin clutch kit solution for the UK aftermarket.

A range of original equipment components, specific tools and bespoke training programmes have already been designed and developed, and LuK is currently assessing the size of the opportunity for independents to offer the owners of vehicles coming out of the warranty period a viable aftermarket option when it comes to buying a replacement twin-clutch.

Due to its success with the DSG, the Volkswagen Group has already announced that more than 40% of the cars they produce will be fitted with a dual clutch system by 2012, and this has not gone unnoticed in the automotive world. With the improved fuel economy and lowered emission levels it can help provide, many other vehicle manufacturers are now beginning to specify twin clutch transmission systems to help keep in line with ever more stringent Government legislation.

Vehicle producers that are currently using twin clutch systems, or who are developing new versions to use in their range include: Audi, Ford, Honda, Hyundai, Mercedes-Benz, Renault, Seat and Skoda. LuK, as ever, will be at the forefront of this rapidly growing market, thanks to its ongoing commitment to innovation, technology and quality.

The benefits of a dual clutch system

• Combines the ease of an automatic transmission with the responsiveness of a manual gearbox
• Similar to an automatic transmission, but with excellent fuel efficiency
• No power interruption during torque transfer
• Significant reduction in CO2 emissions

Clutch Replacement – VW Sharan 1.9 TDI

The Volkswagen Sharan 1.9 TDi was first introduced back in 1995 and has proved very popular with families. With 47,000 Sharans and the shared platform of Ford Galaxy at 125,000 and the Seat Alhambra having 28,000 on the road, most independent garages will certainly have worked on these vehicles.

This vehicle had been fitted with a 4-in-1 conversion kit by the garage and the customer had returned it after only two miles due to the excessive gear rattle. A clutch replacement on the Sharan can be a little tricky but with guidance from LuK the whole process will become much easier.

Nothing out of the ordinary is needed to complete the job, the only special tools required are a transmission jack, a long axle stand and an engine cradle. A two-post ramp was used in this example, however a four-post ramp may also be suitable. For safety reasons it is considered best practice to disconnect the battery earth lead before commencing work. The vehicle may be fitted with anti-theft wheel bolts, so make sure you have the key before you start.

Open the bonnet and remove the plastic n/s engine cover. Disconnect the battery terminals and undo the battery clamp. Lift out the battery and disconnect the electrical connectors (see picture below) and the earth point.

Unbolt the coolant tank support bracket and the bolts securing the tank (see picture below).

Remove the plastic battery surround, making sure you detach the attached wiring harness and locate the hidden fixing bolt behind the ECU (see picture below). Undo the fuel filter bracket bolts and release.

Undo and release the metal battery undertray and unclip the attached wiring harnesses (see picture below). Disconnect the slave cylinder connection on the gearbox and plug to prevent leakage. Remove the clips on the gearchange cables and lift off the linkages.

Stow these to one side then undo the three bolts securing the gear linkage bracket (see picture below) and remove it. Undo and remove the upper bell housing bolts. Support the engine with the engine cradle and undo and remove the gearbox mounting.

Remove the front road wheels and undo the hub nuts on both sides. Undo and carefully lower the plastic undertray then release and lower both suspension arms. Unbolt and remove the bracket securing the starter motor then remove the electrical connections and stow to one side. Undo and remove the n/s driveshaft bolts to the gearbox and lift out the driveshaft. Undo and remove the o/s driveshaft support (see first image below) and lift out the driveshaft. Undo and remove the rear lower engine steady bracket (see second image below). Release the reverse light switch connector and undo the final bell housing bolts. Using a suitable support you are now able to lower the gearbox to the floor.

With the clutch removed, the solid flywheel was removed easily and the new OE DMF was fitted. Normally you would check the dual mass flywheel (DMF) for signs of heat stress and evidence of grease loss. The DMF should also be tested for freeplay and rock between the primary and secondary masses; LuK tool number 400 0080 10 is specifically designed for this purpose on all LuK manufactured DMF’s. Full instructions and tolerance data for all LuK DMFs are contained on a CD which comes with this special tool.

Clean the first motion shaft splines and any debris from the bell housing (especially important when a release bearing has failed). Remember, if the bearing or sleeve is made of plastic there is no need for lubrication. If both parts are metal then a high melting point grease should be used and not copper-based products.

Put a small dab of grease on the first motion shaft splines and make sure the new driven plate slides freely back and forth. This not only spreads the grease evenly but also makes sure you have the correct kit. Wipe any excess grease off the shaft and driven plate hub. Using a universal alignment tool and checking the driven plate is the correct way round (note “Getriebe Seite” is German for “Gearbox Side”) the clutch can be bolted to the flywheel evenly and sequentially.

Before fitting the gearbox make sure the locating dowels are in place and not damaged. Refit any that have become dislodged and refit the gearbox. Make sure the gearbox bell housing bolts are secured before lowering the jack. Refitting is the reverse of removal.

How to replace a clutch on a Ford S-Max

The S-Max is a common sight in the UK after gaining a reputation for reliability and quality. As a result, it is now a regular fixture in the aftermarket scene. A clutch replacement is really easy to do, and, with a few pointers from LuK, it should be easy to beat the book time of around five hours.

Nothing out of the ordinary is needed to complete the job; the only special tools required are a transmission jack, an engine support cradle and a long axle stand. A twopost ramp was used in this example, as a fourpost ramp may not provide enough clearance.

For safety reasons, it’s considered best practice to disconnect the battery earth lead before commencing work. If the vehicle has alloy wheels, it may be fitted with anti-theft wheel bolts, so make sure you have the key before you start.

Engage the steering lock

Start by undoing the bolt (Fig 1 below) located in the driver’s foot-well that secures the steering column to the rack (it’s a good idea to engage the steering lock with the wheels pointing straight before removing).

clutch on a Ford S-Max

Fig 1

Open the bonnet and remove the engine cover. Disconnect the Mass Air Flow (MAF) sensor, and undo the jubilee clip securing the air-filter housing to the inlet manifold pipe. Detach the inlet pipe and unclip the wiring harness clipped to the side of the air-filter. Remove the complete air-filter housing by pulling it upwards sharply to release it from its rubber mountings. Disconnect the reverse light switch and unclip the battery tray cover by releasing the lugs (Fig 2 below) on either side.

clutch on a Ford S-Max

Fig 2

Unbolt the earth connection located down the side of the battery tray (Fig 3 below) and stow it to one side.

clutch on a Ford S-Max

Fig 3

Remove the two positive battery connections and stow them both to one side. Undo the battery clamp and slide the battery out of the tray. Undo the three bolts securing the battery tray to the chassis and disconnect any electrical connections attached to the tray.

Remove the tray and undo the earth connection on the gearbox mounting and the wiring harnesses attached to the gearbox.

Unclip the gear selector cables and release them from the securing bracket before stowing them to one side. Remove the gear selector cable support bracket and disconnect the slave cylinder (Fig 4 below) remembering to plug both ends to prevent any leakage.

clutch on a Ford S-Max

Fig 4

Support the engine with the cradle and remove the upper bell-housing and starter bolts. The gearbox support bracket can now be removed.

Raise the vehicle and remove the nearside wheel and the single hub bolt. Lower the nearside wheel arch liner, and remove the large plastic undertray. Undo and remove the rear gearbox support mount, remembering that the exhaust clamp (Fig 5 below) can be slackened to enable the steel cover to be removed.

clutch on a Ford S-Max

Fig 5

Undo the jubilee clip securing theintake pipe to the intercooler, and unbolt the fixings running under the oil sump. Move the pipe to one side. Undo the nearside lower arm fixings to the chassis, and release the arm (Fig 6 below), so that it can be stowed to one side.

clutch on a Ford S-Max

Fig 6

Drain the gearbox fluid and remove the short driveshaft from the hub and the gearbox. Undo the rear subframe brace (Fig 7 below) and, while supporting the subframe, slacken all the bolts securing it to the body.

clutch on a Ford S-Max

Fig 7

Lower the subframe down on the gearbox side, so that there is enough space to move the gearbox across. Remove the final bellhousing bolts and, with support, slide the gearbox across allowing the subframe to support its weight. The clutch, DMF and CSC can now be worked on.

With the clutch removed, check the dual mass flywheel (DMF) for signs of heat stress and evidence of grease loss. The DMF should also be tested for freeplay and rock between the primary and secondary masses (LuK tool number 400 0080 10 is specifically designed for this purpose on all LuK manufactured DMF’s). Full instructions and tolerance data for all LuK DMFs are contained on a CD which comes with this special tool.

Check the driven plate

Clean the first motion shaft splines and any debris from the bell housing (especially important when a release bearing has failed). Put a small dab of high melting point grease(not a copper-based product) on the first motion shaft splines, and make sure the new driven plate slides freely back and forth. This not only spreads the grease evenly but also makes sure you have the correct kit.

Wipe any excess grease off the shaft and driven plate hub. Using a universal alignment tool and checking the driven plate is the correct way round (note “Getriebe Seite” is German for “Gearbox Side”) the clutch can be bolted to the flywheel evenly and sequentially.

Before fitting the gearbox make sure the locating dowels are in place and not damaged. Refit any that have become dislodged and refit the gearbox. Make sure the gearbox bell housing bolts are secured before lowering the jack. Refitting is the reverse of the removal.

How to change a clutch on a Ford Ka

The Ford KA was first introduced way back in 1996 with the second generation being launched in 2008. The small city car is still very popular, with over 400,000 on the UK roads alone today.

In this article the guys at LuK take a look at a 2004 1.3 KA clutch replacement and give some handy hints to help any UK independent aftermarket garage undertaking the repair.

The clutch replacement is pretty straight forward and nothing out of the ordinary is required to complete the job. We used a two-post ramp and two transmission jacks. It is best practice to disconnect the battery earth terminal and stow safely. If the vehicle is fitted with alloy wheel then make sure the locking tool is available before starting the repair.

Remove the air filter housing and pipes. Disconnect the speed sensor plug which is hidden away at the rear of the engine compartment.

How to change a clutch on a Ford Ka

Remove the top two bell housing bolts that also hold in place a bracket for the wiring loom and the earth lead.

How to change a clutch on a Ford Ka

Disconnect the slave cylinder feeder pipe and release the hydraulic hose from its retaining bracket.

How to change a clutch on a Ford Ka

Raise the vehicle and remove the nearside front wheel. Disconnect the reverse light switch and remove the bottom radiator hose from its retaining clip.

How to change a clutch on a Ford Ka

Remove the driveshaft heat protection plate and then release the two bell housing bolts seated just above.

How to change a clutch on a Ford Ka

The protection plate is attached to one of the bell housing bolts. Remove all the bolts from both sides that attach the control arms to the chassis and disconnect the anti-roll bar link only on the nearside. The control arms are easily aligned back in place because they have alignment pins for re-fitment. The nearside control arm can then be swung to the side on the ball joint and supported using a bungee tie to take the weight.

How to change a clutch on a Ford Ka

Support the engine and gearbox using the transmission jacks and remove the front gearbox mount from its position. Release the starter motor bolts and remove the remaining bell housing bolts. Withdraw the gearbox carefully into the wheel arch and make sure it is supported safely; you should now have enough clearance to remove the clutch and slave cylinder. With the clutch removed check the flywheel for signs of heat stress or excessive wear. Clean the first motion shaft splines and any debris from the bell housing.

Put a small dab of high melting point grease (not a copper-based product) on the first motion shaft splines and make sure the new driven plate slides freely back and forth. This not only spreads the grease evenly but also makes sure you have the correct kit. Wipe away any excess grease off the shaft and driven plate hub. Using a universal alignment tool and checking the driven plate is the correct way round (note “Getriebe Seite” is German for “Gearbox Side”), the clutch can be bolted to the flywheel evenly and sequentially. Install the new slave cylinder without pumping the bearing as this will damage the component.

Make sure the dowels have not become dislodged or damaged and replace any that have. Install the gearbox and make sure the bolts are secured and all mountings are refitted before removing the supporting transmission jacks. Refitting the rest of the components is the reverse of removal.

How to change a clutch on a Ford Fiesta

In this month’s ‘Clutch Clinic’, the experts at LuK offer some handy hints to help out any independent garages that may be faced with a clutch replacement on the Ford Fiesta 2011 1.4tdci.

The Ford Fiesta, one of the most popular small vehicles on the UK roads today, is available in many different engine options and body styles and has proved to be a popular choice of vehicle for all ranges of driver.

You will require two transmission jacks and an engine support beam to carry out the clutch replacement. We used a two-post ramp for the repair but a four-post ramp would also be suitable. If the vehicle has alloy wheels fitted then make sure that the locking key is available before starting the job.

Remove the battery
First disconnect both battery leads, as the battery will need to be removed completely. Stow the leads safely and securely out of the way. Unclip the DPF pressure sensor from the air filter box and stow securely out of the way.

How to change a clutch on a Ford Fiesta

Remove the air filter housing as one complete unit.

Disconnect the MAF sensor, which is now accessible and stow securely out of the way. Remove the battery retaining plate and remove the battery. Unbolt the ECU that is attached to the battery housing and carefully stow the ECU.

How to change a clutch on a Ford Fiesta
You will need to remove the battery housing to gain access to the top of the gearbox so you can remove a starter motor bolt, one top bell housing bolt and a wiring loom.
Remove the bolt for the earth lead that also holds in place the bracket for the slave cylinder pipe.

How to change a clutch on a Ford Fiesta
Stow the earth cable and hydraulic pipe, including the bracket safely. The wiring loom is cable-tied to a second bracket that is held in place by the starter motor and bell housing bolt. Break the cable tie from the bracket and remove the bolt. Safely stow the wiring loom so it is clear from being caught when refitting the bell housing.

How to change a clutch on a Ford Fiesta

Support the engine with an engine support beam and remove the three top gearbox mount bolts and carefully raise the vehicle.

Remove the front wheels
With the vehicle now raised, drain the transmission oil and then remove both front wheels. The gear selection mechanism is located in a housing on the side of the gearbox; remove the plastic protection cover to expose the gear change cables.
How to change a clutch on a Ford Fiesta

The cables are the “pop off” type so they can be easily disconnected, however don’t forget to stow them securely. Disconnect the reverse light switch.

How to change a clutch on a Ford Fiesta

Remove the bolts from the N/S and O/S bottom ball joints and disconnect both of them from position. Slacken the bolts holding the support bearing bracket and drive shaft.

How to change a clutch on a Ford Fiesta

Remove the N/S drive shaft completely. The O/S drive shaft can just be removed from the gearbox side and supported safely out of the way. Support the gearbox with the transmission jack and remove the bottom gearbox mount. Remove the remaining bell housing bolts and separate the gearbox from the engine before carefully lowering to the floor. Remove the worn clutch and CSC.

Check the flywheel for signs of heat stress or excessive wear. If the surface of the flywheel is to be skimmed, make sure that the same amount is taken from the clutch bolting surface. Failure to check and rectify these areas may cause the clutch to operate incorrectly. Clean the bell housing and remove any debris. If any oil leaks are visible then these must be repaired before refitting the gearbox. Before fitting the new clutch disc make sure the input shaft is clean and free from any wear.

Put a small dab of high melting point grease (not a copper-based product) on the first motion shaft splines and make sure the new driven plate slides freely back and forth. This not only spreads the grease evenly but also makes sure you have the correct kit. Wipe away any excess grease off the shaft and driven plate hub. Using a universal alignment tool and checking the driven plate is the correct way round (note “Getriebe Seite” is German for “Gearbox Side”), the clutch can be bolted to the flywheel evenly and sequentially. Install the new slave cylinder without pumping the bearing as this will damage the component.

Make sure any dowels have not become dislodged or damaged and replace any that have. Install the gearbox and make sure the bolts are secured and all mountings are refitted before removing the supporting transmission jacks. Refitting the remaining components is the reverse of removal.

How to fit a clutch on a Ford Ranger

VEHICLE: Ford Ranger
LABOUR TIME: 4 HOURS
LUK P/N: DMF (415041010), DMF BOLTS (411019410), CLUTCH KIT (625305100)

With over 20,000 vehicles on the road the Ford Ranger is among the new breed of ‘company’ vehicles for builders, farmers and our own version of the ‘Baby Boomers’ in the USA, where a generation grew up wanting a big pick up!

The huge gearbox on the 4 x 4 should not put you off as long as you have a ramp, a couple of transmission jacks and a serious attitude towards health and safety. Indeed, it is fairly easy to change the clutch and Dual Mass Flywheel (DMF), if necessary.

The first thing to do is to get under the bonnet and disconnect the battery; as the starter motor is left to do its thing later this is the safest option. In the cab the clipped-in centre console needs removing, together with the two screws retaining the gearstick grommet plate.

After selecting Neutral and lifting the second grommet, remove the six bolts retaining the gear sticks, noting which one goes in which hole (although it’s difficult to get it wrong).

With the vehicle in the air remove the front metal undertray and the transfer box protection plate.

Mark the propshafts to the flanges, as we don’t want to introduce a balancing issue that was not there before. Undo the rear propshaft at the gearbox, remove the centre bearing and stow/support the propshaft to one side. Undo the bolts and remove the front propshaft completely.

Disconnect as much of the gearbox harness as you can, but you may need to come back to some of the higher connections when you lower the gearbox back-end a little. Remove the bolt securing the exhaust clamp to the gearbox bracket and remove the bracket from the gearbox. Remove the two bolts securing the slave cylinder and stow it safely to one side.

Bolt removal

Support the rear of the gearbox with one of the transmission jacks and remove the eight bolts securing the gearbox support beam to chassis. Then remove the three bolts securing it to the rear gearbox mount (one of them is up inside the beam, but easily accessible from underneath) and remove the beam.

Slacken and remove the four bolts securing the front axle support beam to the body.

This will allow the front differential to drop a vital few inches and will ensure the differential drive flange is out of the way of the gearbox bell housing for removal.

Lower the rear of the gearbox to allow better access to the remaining harness connections.

This includes the bell housing bolt that secures the harness support bracket. After disconnection and removal stow the harness clear of the work area.

Undo the three starter motor bolts and make sure the starter is free from the bell housing. Remove the remaining nine starter motor bolts; these are all the same, albeit that some have nuts. Bring the other transmission jack into position and make sure you’re happy with the positioning.

Large gearboxes – especially ones with transfer boxes sticking out of the side – present a real hazard as they do not naturally sit on two transmission jacks and are likely (or required) to rotate when removing.

With the utmost care withdraw the gearbox – this may be tight on the dowels. Carefully lower the gearbox and make sure it is secure before continuing.

Remove the clutch and, under normal circumstances, you would test the DMF for rotational freeplay and rock. The maximum limits for this DMF are six teeth freeplay and 2.9mm of rock.Make sure this last measurement is taken precisely, rather than estimated, as DMF rock can be very misleading.

In this case the secondary mass had rotated, covering the bolts, which meant it had exceeded its torque capacity.

In most cases this would point to a chip-tuned vehicle but, in this example, we knew the vehicle had a gearbox seizure which would led to the same problem. Using the DMF special tool the primary mass was locked and the secondary mass rotated to expose the bolts. As the DMF was scrap we used a long bolt through the clutch fixing hole to lock the flywheel in a position where the bolts were accessible.

Check for leaks

When removed the crank seal should be checked for leaks and the spigot bearing checked and lubricated before the rebuild can begin. Check the clutch fork for damage and wear, and if the ball pivot and socket are both metal lubricate it with High Melting Point Grease (HMPG). Lubricate the splined input shaft with HMPG, slide the new driven plate up and down the shaft and then wipe off any excess.

As it’s a Self Adjusting Clutch (SAC) the new clutch should be pre-loaded to the flywheel before fitting the bolts. This prevents any accidental distortion of the clutch cover, and guarantees no clutch judder or de-adjustment. The SAC special tool is available from the same source as the LuK clutch and DMF and will ensure a professional repair.

The rest of the assembly is the reverse of the removal, taking special care when handling the heavy gearbox.

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MEET THEM AT MECHANEX

Schaeffler Automotive Aftermarket’s three quality brands – LuK, INA and FAG – will all be in attendance throughout 2015 at our MECHANEX trade shows.

Offering visitors the opportunity to talk to Schaeffler’s group of experienced experts who will be on hand to offer helpful demonstrations and workshop hints, attendees can also find out about the latest technologies that will soon be appearing in their workshop.